Call for Papers for the 8th International Interdisciplinary Conference, to be held in Nairobi, Kenya on June 27 to 30, 2018 at Multimedia University of Kenya

Call for Papers for the 8th International Interdisciplinary Conference, to be held in Nairobi, Kenya on June 27 to 30, 2018 at Multimedia University of Kenya

 

General conference theme: Development from below and from above in Africa

 

Conference Venue: Multimedia University of Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya

 

Sponsors: African Interdisciplinary Studies Association (AISA), Kenya Scholars and Studies Association (KESSA), Centre for Democracy, Research and Development (CEDRED) and Multimedia University of Kenya

 

Africa has been willing and unwilling recipient of many models of development, some of which have been top down while others have been bottom up. Many of these models have been developed outside Africa while others have been generated largely from within the continent. Fifty years after independence, there are many countries in Africa which are still struggling to find which models are suitable to their development needs. They are still looking for way forward in terms of which development models work better. There is an emergence of development models that are hybrids of bottom up and top down in which there is a middle ground. in Kenya for example, the creation of the devolved units at County level is seen as a middle ground, the same to states in Nigeria and some regions in South Africa. The tensions between devolved units and national or federal governments in Africa suggest that hybrids have their own challenges as well. Julius Nyerere’s Ujamaa and Jomo Kenyatta’s Harambee have often been seen as development models from above while others see them as having grassroots origins. What are some of the top down or bottom up development models that have worked successfully in Africa? To what extent are these development models internal or external? How can we determine success of a development model? What are the parameters and characteristics that one needs to look for, to determine success or failure of a development model? What is the way forward? These are some of the questions that the conference organizers hope will be answered by participants.

 

Organized and hosted by African Interdisciplinary Studies Association (AISA) and the Centre for Democracy, Research and Development (CEDRED), this 8th International Interdisciplinary Conference will be held on June 27 to 30, 2018 at Nairobi, Kenya. The conference will bring together scholars from all over the world to make presentations on matters that touch on Africa. Submission of abstracts: Send abstracts of between 250 and 500 words, including full contact details (title, name, address, email-address, and telephone) as well as institutional affiliation by March 30, 2018 to Prof. Maurice N. Amutabi at mauriceamutabi@gmail.com or neddylinnet@gmail.com or Amutabi@yahoo.com or Amutabi@gmail.com  or centredrd@gmail.com

 

The deadline for submission of full papers or PowerPoint presentation is May 30, 2018. Most papers presented at the conference will be selected and published in edited volumes and journals affiliated to African Interdisciplinary Studies Association (AISA) and the Centre for Democracy, Research and Development (CEDRED). The official language of the conference is English. The conference will consist of ten colloquia organized along themes.

 

Important dates

Deadline for submission of abstracts – March 30, 2018

Deadline for submission of PowerPoint presentation or full papers May 30, 2018

Conference dates – June 27-30, 2018

Colloquium 1: Development Approaches and Dynamics in the world

Sub Themes:

  1. Rapid Rural Appraisal (RRA), Project Planning, Project Cycle, ‘Green’ development
  2. Grassroots and Community Based Development Approaches
  3. Development from below – Ujamaa, Harambee, etc
  4. Sector-based Development: Mining, Energy, Water, Pastoralism, Agriculture, Fishing, bee-keeping, Roads, Railways, Air transport, Health, taxi transport (Matatu, Daladala, etc), etc
  5. Urban and Rural Development
  6. Women, Youth and Minority Development
  7. The UN, INGOs, NGOs and Community Based Organizations in Development
  8. Foreign Aid and Western Development models
  9. Eastern Development Activities in Africa- China, India, etc
  10. Poverty Eradication, Poverty Alleviation, Poverty Reduction, Poverty Curse, etc
  11. Millennium Development Goals and Social Development Goals
  12. Social Protection and Corporate Social Responsibility
  13. Religious Organizations and Development
  14. Political Parties, Interest Groups and Development
  15. Philanthropy and Foreign Aid
  16. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

 

Colloquium 2: Environment, Business and Management of Resources

Sub-Themes:

  1. Environment, Climate Change and E-waste Management
  2. Arid and Semi Arid Lands (ASALs)/Rangelands and Development
  3. International Trade, Commerce, e-Commerce and e-Baking
  4. Factories, Industries and Manufacturing
  5. Outsourcing and Africa’s ‘Silicon Valleys’ and ‘Industrial Parks’
  6. European Union, Global Finance and Development
  7. Devolution, Decentralization and Resource Mobilization
  8. Economic Planning and Management of Strategic Natural Resources
  9. Business Management, Human Resource and Entrepreneurship
  10. The Cooperative Movement, Women Groups and Savings Societies
  11. Media, Transport and Communication
  12. Regional Blocs, Integration and Regional Trade
  13. International Trade and Global Business Management
  14. Tourism, Eco-Tourism, Health-Tourism and Development
  15. Transparency and Accountability, Corruption and Ethics in Development
  16. Cable TV, English Premier League, American NBA, Cricket, Rugby and Other Sports
  17. Gambling, Betting and Pyramid schemes in Development
  18. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome.

 

Colloquium 3: Education and Development in Africa

Sub-Themes:

  1. Early Childhood Education, Primary and Secondary Education
  2. Open and Distance Learning (ODL), online learning, e-learning and e-resources
  3. Curriculum Reforms and New Pedagogies in Higher Education
  4. Higher Education, Linkages, Research, Partnerships and Publishing
  5. Industry, Linkages, Exchange Programmes and Collaborations
  6. Special Education
  7. ICT, teleconferencing, webinars, networking and e-Learning
  8. Women, Minorities and Gender mainstreaming in Education
  9. Lifelong Learning, Adult Education and Cooperative Education
  10. Science, Industry, Technology and Education
  11. Private Education and Venture Capital
  12. Technical and Vocational Education
  13. Africa Indigenous Knowledge Systems (IKS)
  14. Research Production, Graduate Training and Repositories and anti-Plagiarism
  15. University Ranking and Funding in Higher Education
  16. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

 

Colloquium 4: Courts, Constitutions and Human Rights

Sub-Themes:

  1. International Court System, Independence of Courts in Africa
  2. Human Rights
  3. Indigenous, Local, National and Global Legal Systems
  4. Conflict Transformation and Peace Building Issues
  5. Dictatorships, Democracies and Constitutional reforms
  6. The role of women and minorities in legal issues
  7. Court reporting and Courts in Social Media
  8. Alternative Justice Systems in Africa – Councils of Elders
  9. Environmental Law and Conservation
  10. Role of Regional Blocs and UN in Arbitration in Conflicts
  11. Women, Youth and Courts
  12. Civic and Citizen Education
  13. Land, Special Courts and Small Claims Courts
  14. Human Trafficking and Global Recruitment Firms
  15. IDPs, Refugees, Illegal and Forced Migration
  16. Protocols, Agreements, Treaties and Accords
  17. Truth Commissions and Restoration of Justice
  18. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

 

Colloquium 5: Engineering, Science and Technology

Sub-Themes:

  1. Highways, Roads, Bridges and Applied Technology
  2. Technical Training, Science, Technology and Development
  3. Agriculture, livestock and fisheries
  4. Engineering and Natural Resource Management
  5. Patents, Trademarks, Technology and Innovation
  6. Manufacturing, Industry and University Collaboration
  7. Research and Development (R&D)
  8. Industrial Parks and Innovation Villages
  9. Innovation, Science, Technology and Environment
  10. ICT, Science and Technology
  11. Science, Technology and Gender
  12. Science, Children and Youth
  13. Health Tourism, Medicine, HIV and AIDS
  14. Transport (Roads, railways, ports nd harbours) and Development
  15. Informal (Jua kali) sector and non formal sector
  16. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

 

Colloquium 6: The Third Sector, Religious Organizations and non State Agencies in Development

Sub-Themes:

  1. The Third Sector and Development
  2. Islam and Christianity and Development
  3. Radical Religious Groups
  4. Media and the Church
  5. Ethics and Development
  6. Faith-Based NGOs
  7. Philanthropy and Development
  8. Religious Institutions and Development
  9. Al Qaeda, Boko Haram, Al Shabaab and global peace and security
  10. NGOs and Grassroots Development
  11. Income generating groups
  12. State corporations
  13. TV and Global Mega Evangelists
  14. Religion and Environment
  15. Religion, Gender and Women
  16. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

 

Colloquium 7: Security, Peace and Conflict

Sub-Themes:

  1. Global Security Architecture and Africa
  2. Al Qaeda, Boko Haram, Al Shabaab and global peace and security
  3. Conflict, Rebel activities, War and Violence
  4. The UN, African Union, Gender and Human Rights
  5. Peace and Security in the Great Lakes Region
  6. Conflict Management
  7. War and Refugees
  8. Ethical Issues in Development
  9. Democracy, Leadership and Governance
  10. Dictatorship, term limits and Corruption
  11. Regional Bodies and peace
  12. Displacement, Refugees and International Affairs
  13. Failed and near-failed states in Africa
  14. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

 

Colloquium 8: Library, Information and Communication Technology

Sub-Themes:

  1. a) Information and Communication Technology (ICT)
  2. b) The nature and state of ICT in the world and Africa
  3. c) Mobile Libraries, Dissemination and publishing
  4. d) Library Resources and Development
  5. e) E-Library/Virtual library
  6. f) E- books/E-Journals
  7. g) Internet Research and online publishing
  8. h) Communication and Journalism
  9. i) Language, FM Radio and TV stations and Development
  10. Gender and ICT in Africa
  11. ICT and environment in Africa
  12. Business innovations in ICT – m-pesa, m-kopa, m-shwari, etc
  13. Oral literature and oral narratives and texts
  14. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

 

Colloquium 9: Interdisciplinary and Multidisciplinary Research on Diverse Fields

Sub-Themes:

  1. Challenges of invention of states and ethnic groups in Africa
  2. Indigenous Knowledge Systems and Development in Africa
  3. Gender, Women and Development in Africa
  4. Corporate Social Responsibility
  5. Aid and Sectoral Development
  6. New Paradigms of Development
  7. Minority Groups and Tensions
  8. Interdisciplinary Research and Development
  9. Public Policy and Ecology
  10. Entrepreneurship and Development
  11. Minorities and Development
  12. Integrated Rural Urban Development
  13. Funding Interdisciplinary Research and Development
  14. Social, Economic and Political Research
  15. Research Regimes
  16. Opinion polls, surveys and mapping in Africa
  17. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

 

Colloquium 10: Roundtables, independent panels and association meetings

Sub-Themes:

  1. Open for any panels or roundtables or association meetings
  2. Any relevant topic

 

Registration Fees:

  1. Staff from East African Universities and Organizations US$ 60 (KES 6,000)
  2. Rest of Africa US$ 150
  3. Rest of the World – Europe, North America, Asia, etc US$ 200
  4. Exhibition and advertising stand – US$ 200

 

Registration fee payments to: African Interdisciplinary Studies Association (AISA), Nairobi, Kenya

ALL GENERAL ENQUIRIES TO BE ADDRESSED TO:

Prof. Maurice N. Amutabi, Convenor and Chair

African Interdisciplinary Studies Association (AISA), Nairobi, Kenya

P.O. Box 13447-00400,

Nairobi, Kenya

E-mail: africanstudiesassociaiton@gmail.com or mauriceamutabi@gmail.com or neddylinnet@gmail.com or Amutabi@yahoo.com or Amutabi@gmail.com

 

 

 

for Papers for the 8th International Interdisciplinary Conference, to be held in Nairobi, Kenya on June 27 to 30, 2018 at Multimedia University of Kenya

 

General conference theme: Development from below and from above in Africa

 

Conference Venue: Multimedia University of Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya

 

Sponsors: African Interdisciplinary Studies Association (AISA), Kenya Scholars and Studies Association (KESSA), Centre for Democracy, Research and Development (CEDRED) and Multimedia University of Kenya

 

Africa has been willing and unwilling recipient of many models of development, some of which have been top down while others have been bottom up. Many of these models have been developed outside Africa while others have been generated largely from within the continent. Fifty years after independence, there are many countries in Africa which are still struggling to find which models are suitable to their development needs. They are still looking for way forward in terms of which development models work better. There is an emergence of development models that are hybrids of bottom up and top down in which there is a middle ground. in Kenya for example, the creation of the devolved units at County level is seen as a middle ground, the same to states in Nigeria and some regions in South Africa. The tensions between devolved units and national or federal governments in Africa suggest that hybrids have their own challenges as well. Julius Nyerere’s Ujamaa and Jomo Kenyatta’s Harambee have often been seen as development models from above while others see them as having grassroots origins. What are some of the top down or bottom up development models that have worked successfully in Africa? To what extent are these development models internal or external? How can we determine success of a development model? What are the parameters and characteristics that one needs to look for, to determine success or failure of a development model? What is the way forward? These are some of the questions that the conference organizers hope will be answered by participants.

 

Organized and hosted by African Interdisciplinary Studies Association (AISA) and the Centre for Democracy, Research and Development (CEDRED), this 8th International Interdisciplinary Conference will be held on June 27 to 30, 2018 at Nairobi, Kenya. The conference will bring together scholars from all over the world to make presentations on matters that touch on Africa. Submission of abstracts: Send abstracts of between 250 and 500 words, including full contact details (title, name, address, email-address, and telephone) as well as institutional affiliation by March 30, 2018 to Prof. Maurice N. Amutabi at mauriceamutabi@gmail.com or neddylinnet@gmail.com or Amutabi@yahoo.com or Amutabi@gmail.com  or centredrd@gmail.com

 

The deadline for submission of full papers or PowerPoint presentation is May 30, 2018. Most papers presented at the conference will be selected and published in edited volumes and journals affiliated to African Interdisciplinary Studies Association (AISA) and the Centre for Democracy, Research and Development (CEDRED). The official language of the conference is English. The conference will consist of ten colloquia organized along themes.

 

Important dates

Deadline for submission of abstracts – March 30, 2018

Deadline for submission of PowerPoint presentation or full papers May 30, 2018

Conference dates – June 27-30, 2018

Colloquium 1: Development Approaches and Dynamics in the world

Sub Themes:

  1. Rapid Rural Appraisal (RRA), Project Planning, Project Cycle, ‘Green’ development
  2. Grassroots and Community Based Development Approaches
  3. Development from below – Ujamaa, Harambee, etc
  4. Sector-based Development: Mining, Energy, Water, Pastoralism, Agriculture, Fishing, bee-keeping, Roads, Railways, Air transport, Health, taxi transport (Matatu, Daladala, etc), etc
  5. Urban and Rural Development
  6. Women, Youth and Minority Development
  7. The UN, INGOs, NGOs and Community Based Organizations in Development
  8. Foreign Aid and Western Development models
  9. Eastern Development Activities in Africa- China, India, etc
  10. Poverty Eradication, Poverty Alleviation, Poverty Reduction, Poverty Curse, etc
  11. Millennium Development Goals and Social Development Goals
  12. Social Protection and Corporate Social Responsibility
  13. Religious Organizations and Development
  14. Political Parties, Interest Groups and Development
  15. Philanthropy and Foreign Aid
  16. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

 

Colloquium 2: Environment, Business and Management of Resources

Sub-Themes:

  1. Environment, Climate Change and E-waste Management
  2. Arid and Semi Arid Lands (ASALs)/Rangelands and Development
  3. International Trade, Commerce, e-Commerce and e-Baking
  4. Factories, Industries and Manufacturing
  5. Outsourcing and Africa’s ‘Silicon Valleys’ and ‘Industrial Parks’
  6. European Union, Global Finance and Development
  7. Devolution, Decentralization and Resource Mobilization
  8. Economic Planning and Management of Strategic Natural Resources
  9. Business Management, Human Resource and Entrepreneurship
  10. The Cooperative Movement, Women Groups and Savings Societies
  11. Media, Transport and Communication
  12. Regional Blocs, Integration and Regional Trade
  13. International Trade and Global Business Management
  14. Tourism, Eco-Tourism, Health-Tourism and Development
  15. Transparency and Accountability, Corruption and Ethics in Development
  16. Cable TV, English Premier League, American NBA, Cricket, Rugby and Other Sports
  17. Gambling, Betting and Pyramid schemes in Development
  18. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome.

 

Colloquium 3: Education and Development in Africa

Sub-Themes:

  1. Early Childhood Education, Primary and Secondary Education
  2. Open and Distance Learning (ODL), online learning, e-learning and e-resources
  3. Curriculum Reforms and New Pedagogies in Higher Education
  4. Higher Education, Linkages, Research, Partnerships and Publishing
  5. Industry, Linkages, Exchange Programmes and Collaborations
  6. Special Education
  7. ICT, teleconferencing, webinars, networking and e-Learning
  8. Women, Minorities and Gender mainstreaming in Education
  9. Lifelong Learning, Adult Education and Cooperative Education
  10. Science, Industry, Technology and Education
  11. Private Education and Venture Capital
  12. Technical and Vocational Education
  13. Africa Indigenous Knowledge Systems (IKS)
  14. Research Production, Graduate Training and Repositories and anti-Plagiarism
  15. University Ranking and Funding in Higher Education
  16. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

 

Colloquium 4: Courts, Constitutions and Human Rights

Sub-Themes:

  1. International Court System, Independence of Courts in Africa
  2. Human Rights
  3. Indigenous, Local, National and Global Legal Systems
  4. Conflict Transformation and Peace Building Issues
  5. Dictatorships, Democracies and Constitutional reforms
  6. The role of women and minorities in legal issues
  7. Court reporting and Courts in Social Media
  8. Alternative Justice Systems in Africa – Councils of Elders
  9. Environmental Law and Conservation
  10. Role of Regional Blocs and UN in Arbitration in Conflicts
  11. Women, Youth and Courts
  12. Civic and Citizen Education
  13. Land, Special Courts and Small Claims Courts
  14. Human Trafficking and Global Recruitment Firms
  15. IDPs, Refugees, Illegal and Forced Migration
  16. Protocols, Agreements, Treaties and Accords
  17. Truth Commissions and Restoration of Justice
  18. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

 

Colloquium 5: Engineering, Science and Technology

Sub-Themes:

  1. Highways, Roads, Bridges and Applied Technology
  2. Technical Training, Science, Technology and Development
  3. Agriculture, livestock and fisheries
  4. Engineering and Natural Resource Management
  5. Patents, Trademarks, Technology and Innovation
  6. Manufacturing, Industry and University Collaboration
  7. Research and Development (R&D)
  8. Industrial Parks and Innovation Villages
  9. Innovation, Science, Technology and Environment
  10. ICT, Science and Technology
  11. Science, Technology and Gender
  12. Science, Children and Youth
  13. Health Tourism, Medicine, HIV and AIDS
  14. Transport (Roads, railways, ports nd harbours) and Development
  15. Informal (Jua kali) sector and non formal sector
  16. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

 

Colloquium 6: The Third Sector, Religious Organizations and non State Agencies in Development

Sub-Themes:

  1. The Third Sector and Development
  2. Islam and Christianity and Development
  3. Radical Religious Groups
  4. Media and the Church
  5. Ethics and Development
  6. Faith-Based NGOs
  7. Philanthropy and Development
  8. Religious Institutions and Development
  9. Al Qaeda, Boko Haram, Al Shabaab and global peace and security
  10. NGOs and Grassroots Development
  11. Income generating groups
  12. State corporations
  13. TV and Global Mega Evangelists
  14. Religion and Environment
  15. Religion, Gender and Women
  16. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

 

Colloquium 7: Security, Peace and Conflict

Sub-Themes:

  1. Global Security Architecture and Africa
  2. Al Qaeda, Boko Haram, Al Shabaab and global peace and security
  3. Conflict, Rebel activities, War and Violence
  4. The UN, African Union, Gender and Human Rights
  5. Peace and Security in the Great Lakes Region
  6. Conflict Management
  7. War and Refugees
  8. Ethical Issues in Development
  9. Democracy, Leadership and Governance
  10. Dictatorship, term limits and Corruption
  11. Regional Bodies and peace
  12. Displacement, Refugees and International Affairs
  13. Failed and near-failed states in Africa
  14. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

 

Colloquium 8: Library, Information and Communication Technology

Sub-Themes:

  1. a) Information and Communication Technology (ICT)
  2. b) The nature and state of ICT in the world and Africa
  3. c) Mobile Libraries, Dissemination and publishing
  4. d) Library Resources and Development
  5. e) E-Library/Virtual library
  6. f) E- books/E-Journals
  7. g) Internet Research and online publishing
  8. h) Communication and Journalism
  9. i) Language, FM Radio and TV stations and Development
  10. Gender and ICT in Africa
  11. ICT and environment in Africa
  12. Business innovations in ICT – m-pesa, m-kopa, m-shwari, etc
  13. Oral literature and oral narratives and texts
  14. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

 

Colloquium 9: Interdisciplinary and Multidisciplinary Research on Diverse Fields

Sub-Themes:

  1. Challenges of invention of states and ethnic groups in Africa
  2. Indigenous Knowledge Systems and Development in Africa
  3. Gender, Women and Development in Africa
  4. Corporate Social Responsibility
  5. Aid and Sectoral Development
  6. New Paradigms of Development
  7. Minority Groups and Tensions
  8. Interdisciplinary Research and Development
  9. Public Policy and Ecology
  10. Entrepreneurship and Development
  11. Minorities and Development
  12. Integrated Rural Urban Development
  13. Funding Interdisciplinary Research and Development
  14. Social, Economic and Political Research
  15. Research Regimes
  16. Opinion polls, surveys and mapping in Africa
  17. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

 

Colloquium 10: Roundtables, independent panels and association meetings

Sub-Themes:

  1. Open for any panels or roundtables or association meetings
  2. Any relevant topic

 

Registration Fees:

  1. Staff from East African Universities and Organizations US$ 60 (KES 6,000)
  2. Rest of Africa US$ 150
  3. Rest of the World – Europe, North America, Asia, etc US$ 200
  4. Exhibition and advertising stand – US$ 200

 

Registration fee payments to: African Interdisciplinary Studies Association (AISA), Nairobi, Kenya

ALL GENERAL ENQUIRIES TO BE ADDRESSED TO:

Prof. Maurice N. Amutabi, Convenor and Chair

African Interdisciplinary Studies Association (AISA), Nairobi, Kenya

P.O. Box 13447-00400,

Nairobi, Kenya

E-mail: africanstudiesassociaiton@gmail.com or mauriceamutabi@gmail.com or neddylinnet@gmail.com or Amutabi@yahoo.com or Amutabi@gmail.com

 

 

 

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Degree, diploma and certificate programs at Lukenya University – January 2018 intake in progress

We are still accepting applications for January 2018 intake and accepting for May 2018. We welcome you to apply to join Lukenya University, which is duly accredited by the Government of Kenya through the Commission for University Education (CUE) as a private university in Kenya, located in Kibwezi in Makueni County. The University received its Letter of Interim Authority from the Commission for Higher Education (CHE), on November 16th, 2015. The letter of Interim Authority is the first accreditation step for private Universities in Kenya. The University offers the following programs:

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Programme Minimum qualifications Mode of Study Duration Tuition Fee
Bachelor of Commerce (B.Com)–          Finance

–          Accounting

–          Strategic Management

–          Human Resource Management

–          Entrepreneurship & Small Business

–          Purchasing & Supplies Management

Mean Grade of C+ (plus) in KCSE with a C (plain) in Mathematics & English/Kiswahili OR Diploma in related field from a recognized institution Full Time/ Part time 4 years Ksh. 43,500.00 Per  Trimester
Diploma programsDiploma in Human Resource Management, Diploma in Business Management, Diploma in supply chain Management, Diploma in social work and community development, Diploma in Agriculture, Diploma in building and construction, Diploma in food and beverage, Diploma in Sales and Marketing, Diploma in Marketing Management, Diploma in Co-operative Management, Diploma in Hotel & Hospitality Management, Diploma in Ecotourism & Hospitality Management, Diploma in Project Management, Diploma in County Leadership Management, Diploma in Procurement & Logistics Management, Mean  Grade C- OR  Certificate in a related area  with  a credit pass from a recognized institution Full Time/ Part time 2  Years
Certificate coursesCertificate in Sales & Marketing, Certificate in Human Resource Management, Certificate in Stores and Supplies, Certificate in Project Management, Certificate in Project Management, Certificate in Business Administration, Certificate in Marketing Management, Certificate in Co-operative Management , Certificate in Eco-tourism & Hospitality Management, Certificate in Hotel & Hospitality Management, Certificate in Accounting & Finance, Certificate in Secretarial Management & Administration, Certificate in Risk Management, Certificate in Credit Management, Certificate in Financial Analysis KCSE Mean Grade  of  D+ (plus ) or its equivalent OR Certificate holders  in related areas from recognized institutions Full Time/ Part time 3 months
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
Bachelor of Education -Arts (Options: English& Literature, History & Religious Studies, Geography& Kiswahili, Maths & Business, etc) Mean Grade of C+ (plus) in KCSE and above (Or equivalent) with a C+ (plus) in subjects of specialization. OR Two Principals & two Subsidiary Pass in KACE   OR S1 or diploma in the relevant area, with two years teaching experience Full Time/ Part time/school based 4 years Ksh. 43,500.00 Per  Trimester
Post GraduateDiploma in Education (P.G.D.E) First Degree from a recognized university with two teaching subjects Full time  & School based 1 year Kshs. 35,000 per trimester
Diploma in Teacher Education, Diploma in ECDE KCSE with a minimum of D+ and a P1 certificate with a teaching experience of at least two years   OR  KCSE mean grade of  C with a P1 certificate Full time and school based Kshs. 20,500 per trimester
SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Diploma in Criminology & Security studies, Diploma in Public Administration & Political Science, Diploma in Community Development, Diploma in County Management, Diploma in Project Planning, Diploma in County Leadership and Management, Diploma in Community and Social Development, Diploma in Social Work, Diploma in Public Relations, Diploma in Project Planning & Development. Mean  Grade C- OR  Certificate in a related area  with  a credit pass from a recognized institution Full time and part time
Certificate in Public Relations, Certificate in Social Work, Certificate in Community & Social Development ,Certificate in East African Community Affairs, Certificate in Disaster Management,  Certificate in Public Administration and Evaluation, Certificate in Electoral Law, Administration and Management, Certificate in County Management and Governance, Certificate in Criminology & Security Studies KCSE Mean Grade  of D+ (plus ) or its equivalent OR  Certificate holders  in related areas from recognized institutions Full time 4 months Kshs. 20,500 per trimester

 

Proposed programmes (forthcoming)
1. Bachelors of Arts (BA) in Criminology and Security StudiesBachelor of Arts in Peace and Security Studies Mean Grade of C+ (plus) in KCSE or diploma from a recognized institution Fulltime/Part-time /School Based 4 years Kshs. 43,500 per trimester
2. MA – History, Criminology and Security Studies, Geography, Religious Studies, Literature, Linguistics, Kiswahili, Project Planning & Management, County Governance and Management, Political Science, Diplomacy and International Relations, Development Studies, Peace and Conflict, Sociology, Public Administration and Public Policy Bachelor of Arts in related field with 2nd class   upper division OR 2nd class lower division with 2years working experience Fulltime/Part-time /School Based  2 years Ksh. 55,000Per trimester
3. MBA – Finance, Accounting, Strategic Management, Human Resource Management, Entrepreneurship, Global Economics Bachelor of Arts in related field with 2nd class   upper division OR 2nd class lower division with 2years working experience Fulltime/Part-time /School Based 2 years Kshs. 55,00 per trimester

 

 

Application forms are obtained from the Admissions Office free or charge. There is no application fee for all the programmes at Lukenya University.  Application forms are obtained through our website http://www.lukenyauniversity.ac.ke/index.php  which will be filled and sent together with copies of relevant certificates to: The Registrar – Academic and Students Affairs, The Lukenya University, P.O Box: 619 – 00204 Athi River, Kenya

Apply now and attach copies of relevant certificates, passport size photograph.

 

Payment Mode: Electronic money transfer, money order or bankers’ cheques payable to Lukenya University.

 

Co -operative bank, Athiriver Branch, A/C number 01120065233804 payable at any Co-operative Bank Branch

OR Kenya commercial Bank, Machakos Branch, Acc. No. 1154128822 A/C Name: Lukenya College

 

For further information call           

Tel: 0790-444000 / 0791-444000

E-mail: info@lukenyauniversity.ac.ke

 

Prof. Maurice N. Amutabi, Vice Chancellor, The Lukenya University

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Journal of African Interdisciplinary Studies (JAIS)

Journal of African Interdisciplinary Studies (JAIS)

ISSN 2523-6725

Key title: Journal of African interdisciplinary studies

Abbreviated key title: J. Afr. interdiscip. stud.

Parallel title: JAIS

URL: http://cedred.org/jais/index.php/issues

 

Journal of African Interdisciplinary Studies (JAIS) is a refereed academic journal that provides opportunities for publication of interdisciplinary research carried out in all parts of the world, with focus on Africa. It is a dynamic platform which provides scholars from various disciplinary persuasions opportunity to share their research findings and new theoretical innovations in knowledge creation. The journal targets university and other advanced researchers who are keen to disseminate unique findings to a wide audience. The journal provides room for both junior and senior scholars to present their ideas and research findings in various disciplinary fields. Intended to serve scholars researching on Africa and the whole world, the journal seeks to make noble efforts for the enlightenment of multidisciplinary issues using case studies and examples from all parts of the world. We produce this electronic journal monthly and promote the vibrant research entries with precise and appropriate touches and by bridging the gap between perception and the inception. Join us to sail beyond local horizons and move into global and deep academic reflections that add to knowledge creation in a robust manner.

 

 

 

Description:

  • Area of concentration: Interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary
  • Frequency of publishing: Monthly
  • Mode of publishing: online (e-journal)
  • Language of publication: English
  • Double Blind Review Process
  • Zero Level Plagiarism Tolerance

 

JAIS – Benefits to online publications:

  • Easy and fast publishing process
  • Can be accessed anywhere by other scholars
  • JAIS is an open source journal and promotes wider circulation
  • Low publication fee to promote research work
  • JAIS hopes to be indexed in Google Scholar, Docstoc, ResearchGate, Scribd and many others
  • JAIS provides individual Soft Copy of Certificate of Publication to each Author of an article.

Features:

  • Rigorous peer review process
  • Platform to share research knowledge with the world
  • Promoting research work
  • Platform to showcase research findings
  • Dedicated specialist editorial and review team
  • Multicultural and interdisciplinary focus
  • Low publication fee to promote research work

 

 

The principal purpose of us is to provide assistance to both senior and junior scholars by promoting their research and dissemination. We promote mentoring of junior scholars by senior scholars. We assist scholars to understand peer review comments and incorporate them. We provide space to allow them to transform their research findings and academic papers into publications. We promote interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary research using unique designs such as descriptive survey, case studies, meta-analysis, grand narratives and theories as well as theoretical articles. Please send your paper to: journalafricanstudies@gmail.com

 

 

Submission Guidelines for Journal of African Interdisciplinary Studies (JAIS)

 

The Journal of African Interdisciplinary Studies (JAIS) is an online journal. The JAIS is the principal academic and scholarly journal of the Centre for Democracy, Research and Development (CEDRED) and African Interdisciplinary Studies Association (AISA). The JAIS appears monthly. Manuscripts submitted to the journal should be typed double-spaced, 12 point font (preferably Times New Roman). Submission must be in electronic version, saved as MS Word or RTF attachment (not as PDF). Articles should be between 6,000 and 7,000 words (25 to 30 pages). If copies of maps, charts and graphs are used, they should be provided in camera-ready form. For style manual, use the APA or Harvard Reference System (author – date) for bibliographic referencing, e.g.:

 

The Abasiekwe clan of Bunyore in Western Kenya are regarded as rain makers largely because of their knowledge of reading weather and climate patterns over the years (Amutabi 2015: 119).
Cover page: Name and institutional affiliation: Authors should indicate their full name, address (including e-mail contact, fax and telephone), their academic status and their current institutional affiliation. This should appear on a separate cover page since manuscripts will be sent out anonymously to outside readers. Manuscripts should be submitted as Word or RTF documents via e-mail attachment to either the corresponding editor journalafricanstudies@gmail.com  or the editor responsible for a particular edition.

 

Originality

Articles submitted to Journal of African Interdisciplinary Studies should be original contributions and should not be under consideration by another publication at the same time. If an article is under consideration by another publication the author should inform the editor at the time of submission. Authors are entitled to 40 complementary (free) electronic off-prints in form of pdf file for either printing or distribution.

 

Abstract and keywords: Authors should provide an abstract of their paper (not exceeding 150 words). The abstract should state the main research problem, major findings and conclusions. Articles that do not follow this format will have their processing delayed. A maximum of six words should be given below the abstract.

 

Line spacing: Articles should be double-spaced excluding abstracts, notes and references).

Font: Articles, including tables and illustrations, should be submitted in 12pt Times New Roman font.

 

Paragraphs: Authors should indent each new paragraph, except those immediately following a heading, which should be flush left. Do not leave blank lines between paragraphs.

Mission: The mission of JAIS is to publish the highest quality articles, as well as book and film reviews in all academic disciplines that are of interest to the interdisciplinary audience of the academic world. The editors welcome manuscript submissions from scholars everywhere, whether or not they are from Africa or abroad. Each submitted article is usually sent out to panels of peer reviewers whose verdict the editors rely upon in deciding whether to accept the script for publication or not. The articles that appear in the JAIS are edited by Maurice Amutabi (Lukenya University), Linnet Hamasi (Kenyatta University), Pamela Akinyi Wadende (Kisii University) and Magdalene Ndeto Bore (Lukenya University). Book reviews are commissioned and edited by Joe Mwinzi (University of Nairobi).

 

The Review Process: Each manuscript received by JAIS for publication is immediately assigned a review number to facilitate tracking, and an acknowledgment is sent to the author. The editors read the article and decide whether to go forward with a peer review or to decline to consider it because it fails to meet the JAIS mission or format. If the manuscript is to be reviewed, the editors consult the frequently updated reviewer database of JAIS and AISA, to construct a unique panel of reviewers, whose expertise matches the content of the manuscript. Individuals on this panel are then invited to review the manuscript, and to return their reviews within 20 days. Once three blind peer reviews are received, the editors make a decision whether to accept, to decline the manuscript, or to invite the author to correct and resubmit it. The editors notify the author immediately, and in all cases, the reviewers’ observations are sent to the authors, with the reviewers’ personal identities masked. The revised articles are then published after satisfying remaining editorial requirements.

 

Manuscript Reviews: The JAIS is a double-blind peer-reviewed journal. The editors, while knowledgeable in African studies, cannot possibly command the entire breadth of scholarship on Africa, and so depend on a vast network of experts to evaluate manuscripts and to write substantive reviews. It is double blind because neither the reviewer nor the author knows each other’s identity. JAIS invites original, scholarly articles that discuss the education and learning of adults from different academic disciplines, perspectives and traditions. It encourages diversity in theoretical and methodological approach and submissions. All published contributions in JAIS are subjected to a rigorous peer review process based on two moments of selection: an initial editorial screening and a double-blind review by at least two anonymous referees. Clarity and conciseness of thought are crucial requirements for publication. The peer review process is the best assurance that JAIS will maintain its scholarly quality into the future.

 

The title page: The title page of each paper or article should include, in the following order: Title of the article; Author name(s) (preceded by first names, but with no academic titles given); Name of the institution or organization (if there is more than one author or institution, affiliations should be indicated using superscript Arabic numerals); and an address for correspondence (including the name of the corresponding author with e-mail address and fax and phone numbers).

 

Reference citation: Reference citations in the text and in the reference list proper should follow conventions listed in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association latest edition, referred to hereinafter as the APA Manual. Provide a reference or bibliography that lists every work cited by you in the text.

 

Tables: Tables should be numbered. They must be cited in the text (e.g., ―As shown in Table 1). Below the table number, a brief descriptive title should be given; this should then be followed by the body of the table.

 

Figures: Figures should be numbered. Each figure must be cited in the text (e.g., ―As illustrated in Figure 1). As online submission requires papers to be submitted as one file, figures and tables etc should be embedded or appended to the paper and not be sent as separate files. However, upon acceptance of an article, it may be necessary for figures to be supplied separately in a form suitable for better reproduction: preferably high-resolution (300 dpi) or vector graphics files. Where this is necessary, the corresponding author will be notified by the publishers. Figures will normally be reproduced in black and white only. While it is possible to reproduce color illustrations, authors are reminded that they will be invoiced for the extra costs involved.

 

Scientific classification and style: Authors should follow the guidelines of the APA Manual regarding style and nomenclature. Authors should avoid using masculine generic forms in their manuscripts. Statements about groups of people should be written in gender-neutral form (See APA manual, 66-7).

 

Language: It is recommended that authors use American English spelling. Standard US American spelling and punctuation as given in Webster’s New Collegiate Dictionary should be followed.

 

Proofs: Proofs of camera-ready articles will be sent to the corresponding author for errors. Changes of content or stylistic changes may only be made in exceptional cases in the proofs.

 

Copyright Matters: By submitting an article, the author confirms and guarantees on behalf of him-/herself and any co-authors that the manuscript has not been submitted or published elsewhere, and that he or she holds all copyright in and titles to the submitted contribution, including any figures, photographs, line drawings, plans, maps, sketches, and tables, and that the article and its contents do not infringe in any way on the rights of third parties. The author agrees, upon acceptance of the article for publication, to transfer to the publisher the exclusive right to reproduce and distribute the article and its contents, both physically and in nonphysical, electronic, or other form, in the journal to which it has been submitted and in other independent publications, with no limitations on the number of copies or on the form or the extent of distribution. These rights are transferred for the duration of copyright as defined by international law.

 

Online Rights for Articles appearing in JAIS: Authors of articles published in JAIS may post a copy of the final accepted manuscript for noncommercial purposes, as a word-processor, PDF, or other type of file, on their personal web page or on their employer‘s website after it has been accepted for publication.

 

How to become an African Interdisciplinary Studies Association (AISA) peer reviewer: because JAIS is a professional organization engaged in research, dissemination and mentoring, the editors of the invite individuals, whether members of African Interdisciplinary Studies Association (AISA) or not, to participate in the process of reviewing manuscripts. No remuneration is involved, but you get to participate in shaping scholarship on Africa by providing thoughtful and appropriate comments on research articles and assist editors to make accurate decisions.

 

Journal editors

Prof. Elinami V. Swai

Prof. Maurice N. Amutabi

Prof. Winston Jumba Akala

Dr. Linnet Hamasi

Dr. Pamela Wadende

Dr. Magdalene Ndeto Bore

 

Editorial Advisory Board

 

Prof. Ruth N. Otunga, PhD.

University of Eldoret,

Eldoret, Kenya

 

Prof. Shadrack Nasongo, PhD

Rhodes College

Memphis, Tennessee

USA

 

Prof. Elinami Swai, PhD.

Open University of Tanzania,

Tanzania

 

Prof. Maurice N. Amutabi, PhD.

Lukenya University,

Kenya

 

Prof. John Musalia, PhD.

Northern Kentucky University,

USA

 

Prof. Jan Záhořík, PhD.
University of West Bohemia in Pilsen
Pilsen,

Czech Republic

 

Prof. Frederick Nafukho Muyia, PhD.

Texas A&M University

Texas, USA

 

Prof. Mary Nyangweso-Wangila, PhD.

East Carolina University,

USA

 

Prof. Winston Akala, PhD.

University of Nairobi,

Nairobi, Kenya

 

Prof. Kefa Otiso, PhD.

Bowling Green State University,

Ohio, USA

 

Prof. Eunice Kamaara, PhD.

Moi University

Eldoret,

Kenya

 

Prof. Bongani D. Bantwini, PhD.
North West University

Potchefstroom Campus

South Africa

 

Prof. John Mwaruvie, PhD.

Karatina University, Karatina

Kenya

 

Prof. Edmond Maloba Were, PhD

Kisii University,

Kenya

 

Prof. Frank Khachina Matanga, PhD

Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology,

Kakamega, Kenya

 

Prof. Justus Mbae, PhD

The Catholic University of Eastern Africa,

Nairobi, Kenya

 

Prof. (Eng). Abel Mayaka, PhD

Multimedia University of Kenya,

Nairobi, Kenya

 

Contact us:

 

Journal of African Interdisciplinary Studies (JAIS)

P.O. Box 13447 – 00400 Nairobi – Kenya

Cell +254 700 744 545/ +254 729 758 193

Email:  journalafricanstudies@gmail.com

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Journal of Popular Education in Africa (JOPEA)

Journal of Popular Education in Africa (JOPEA)

 ISSN 2523-2800

 Abbreviated key title: J. pop. educ. Afr.

 Parallel title: JOPEA

 Journal of Popular Education in Africa (JOPEA)

Journal of Popular Education in Africa (JOPEA) is a refereed academic journal that publishes interdisciplinary research outputs from Africa and the rest of the world. With basis in education, the journal seeks to provide a niche for researchers in education in Africa and abroad. It is a rigorous platform that provides academics from diverse fields’ opportunity to accomplish their scholarly desires in knowledge creation and dissemination. The journal provides space for both junior and senior scholars to articulate their ideas and research findings in various disciplinary fields, without discrimination based on gender, race, creed or political belief. Designed to serve scholars researching on Africa and the entire world, the journal seeks to make noble efforts for the enlightenment of multidisciplinary issues using case studies and examples from all parts of the world. We produce this electronic journal monthly and promote the vibrant research entries with precise and appropriate touches and by bridging the gap between perception and the inception. The journal is published on behalf of African Society for Research on the Education of Adults (ASREA)

 Description:

  • Area of concentration: Multidisciplinary
  • Frequency of publishing: Monthly
  • Mode of publishing: online (e-journal)
  • Language of publication: English
  • Double Blind Review Process
  • Zero Level Plagiarism Tolerance

 JOPEA – Benefits to online publications:

  • Easy and fast publishing process
  • Can be accessed anywhere by other scholars
  • JOPEA is an open source journal and promotes wider circulation
  • Low publication fee to promote research work
  • JOPEA hopes to be indexed in Google Scholar, Docstoc, ResearchGate, Scribd and many others
  • JOPEA provides individual Soft Copy of Certificate of Publication to each Author of an article.

Features:

  • Rigorous peer review process
  • Platform to share research knowledge with the world
  • Promoting research work
  • Platform to showcase research findings
  • Dedicated specialist editorial and review team
  • Multicultural and interdisciplinary focus
  • Low publication fee to promote research work

The principal purpose of us is to provide assistance to both senior and junior scholars by promoting their research and dissemination. We promote mentoring of junior scholars by senior scholars. We assist scholars to understand peer review comments and incorporate them. We provide space to allow them to transform their research findings and academic papers into publications. We promote interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary research using unique designs such as descriptive survey, case studies, meta-analysis, grand narratives and theories as well as theoretical articles. Please send your paper to: jopeajournal@gmail.com

Submission Guidelines

We provide one of the easiest environments to authors who seek to publish their work with JOPEA. We recommend ‘Times New Roman’ font style and font size of 12, line spacing of 1 and normal margins on all sides. Authors can easily get started in the easy submission process. Headings (up to 3 levels) should be clearly marked and numbered. Also, if there are tables and diagrams included, these should be placed within the body of the paper near the text that refers to them with appropriate titles and table/figure numbers. References should follow the American Psychological Association (APA) 5th edition style. For more information please visit: http://www.apastyle.org. Please send your paper to

 Submission deadline

There is no deadline. Submission is Open throughout the year as roll in

Paper Publication (Online)

 About Us

The Journal of Popular Education in Africa (JOPEA) is published in Nairobi by the Centre for Democracy, Research and Development on behalf of the African Society for Research on the Education of Adults (ASREA). It is a vigorous interdisciplinary educational research platform providing scholars from diverse fields an ideal opportunity to accomplish their academic desires in knowledge creation and dissemination. The journal provides space for both junior and senior scholars to articulate their ideas and search findings in various disciplinary fields.

Submission Guidelines for Journal of Popular Education in Africa (JOPEA)

Journal of Popular Education in Africa (JOPEA) is an online journal. The JOPEA is the principal academic and scholarly journal of the Centre for Democracy, Research and Development (CEDRED) and the African Society for Research on the Education of Adults (ASREA). The JOPEA appears monthly. Manuscripts submitted to the journal should be typed double-spaced, 12 point font (preferably Times New Roman). Submission must be in electronic version, saved as MS Word or RTF attachment (not as PDF). Articles should be between 6,000 and 7,000 words (25 to 30 pages). If copies of maps, charts and graphs are used, they should be provided in camera-ready form. For style manual, use the APA or Harvard Reference System (author – date) for bibliographic referencing, e.g.:

 

The Abasiekwe clan of Bunyore in Western Kenya are regarded as rain makers largely because of their knowledge of reading weather and climate patterns over the years (Amutabi 2015: 119).

Cover page: Name and institutional affiliation: Authors should indicate their full name, address (including e-mail contact, fax and telephone), their academic status and their current institutional affiliation. This should appear on a separate cover page since manuscripts will be sent out anonymously to outside readers. Manuscripts should be submitted as Word or RTF documents via e-mail attachment to either the corresponding editor jopeajournal@gmail.com  or the editor responsible for a particular edition.

Originality

Articles submitted to Journal of Popular Education in Africa (JOPEA) should be original contributions and should not be under consideration by another publication at the same time. If an article is under consideration by another publication the author should inform the editor at the time of submission. Authors are entitled to 40 complementary (free) electronic off-prints in form of pdf file for either printing or distribution.

 

Abstract and keywords: Authors should provide an abstract of their paper (not exceeding 150 words). The abstract should state the main research problem, major findings and conclusions. Articles that do not follow this format will have their processing delayed. A maximum of six words should be given below the abstract.

 

Line spacing: Articles should be double-spaced excluding abstracts, notes and references).

Font: Articles, including tables and illustrations, should be submitted in 12pt Times New Roman font.

 

Paragraphs: Authors should indent each new paragraph, except those immediately following a heading, which should be flush left. Do not leave blank lines between paragraphs.

Mission: The mission of JOPEA is to publish the highest quality articles, as well as book and film reviews in all academic disciplines that are of interest to the interdisciplinary audience of the academic world. The editors welcome manuscript submissions from scholars everywhere, whether or not they are from Africa or abroad. Each submitted article is usually sent out to panels of peer reviewers whose verdict the editors rely upon in deciding whether to accept the script for publication or not. The articles that appear in the JOPEA are edited by Maurice Amutabi (Lukenya University), Linnet Hamasi (Kenyatta University), Pamela Akinyi Wadende (Kisii University) and Magdalene Ndeto Bore (Lukenya University). Book reviews are commissioned and edited by Joe Mwinzi (University of Nairobi).

 

The Review Process: Each manuscript received by JOPEA for publication is immediately assigned a review number to facilitate tracking, and an acknowledgment is sent to the author. The editors read the article and decide whether to go forward with a peer review or to decline to consider it because it fails to meet the JOPEA mission or format. If the manuscript is to be reviewed, the editors consult the frequently updated reviewer database of JOPEA and AISA, to construct a unique panel of reviewers, whose expertise matches the content of the manuscript. Individuals on this panel are then invited to review the manuscript, and to return their reviews within 20 days. Once three blind peer reviews are received, the editors make a decision whether to accept, to decline the manuscript, or to invite the author to correct and resubmit it. The editors notify the author immediately, and in all cases, the reviewers’ observations are sent to the authors, with the reviewers’ personal identities masked. The revised articles are then published after satisfying remaining editorial requirements.

 

Manuscript Reviews: The JOPEA is a double-blind peer-reviewed journal. The editors, while knowledgeable in African studies, cannot possibly command the entire breadth of scholarship on Africa, and so depend on a vast network of experts to evaluate manuscripts and to write substantive reviews. It is double blind because neither the reviewer nor the author knows each other’s identity. JOPEA invites original, scholarly articles that discuss the education and learning of adults from different academic disciplines, perspectives and traditions. It encourages diversity in theoretical and methodological approach and submissions. All published contributions in JOPEA are subjected to a rigorous peer review process based on two moments of selection: an initial editorial screening and a double-blind review by at least two anonymous referees. Clarity and conciseness of thought are crucial requirements for publication. The peer review process is the best assurance that JOPEA will maintain its scholarly quality into the future.

 

The title page: The title page of each paper or article should include, in the following order: Title of the article; Author name(s) (preceded by first names, but with no academic titles given); Name of the institution or organization (if there is more than one author or institution, affiliations should be indicated using superscript Arabic numerals); and an address for correspondence (including the name of the corresponding author with e-mail address and fax and phone numbers).

 

Reference citation: Reference citations in the text and in the reference list proper should follow conventions listed in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association latest edition, referred to hereinafter as the APA Manual. Provide a reference or bibliography that lists every work cited by you in the text.

 

Tables: Tables should be numbered. They must be cited in the text (e.g., ―As shown in Table 1). Below the table number, a brief descriptive title should be given; this should then be followed by the body of the table.

 

Figures: Figures should be numbered. Each figure must be cited in the text (e.g., ―As illustrated in Figure 1). As online submission requires papers to be submitted as one file, figures and tables etc should be embedded or appended to the paper and not be sent as separate files. However, upon acceptance of an article, it may be necessary for figures to be supplied separately in a form suitable for better reproduction: preferably high-resolution (300 dpi) or vector graphics files. Where this is necessary, the corresponding author will be notified by the publishers. Figures will normally be reproduced in black and white only. While it is possible to reproduce color illustrations, authors are reminded that they will be invoiced for the extra costs involved.

 

Scientific classification and style: Authors should follow the guidelines of the APA Manual regarding style and nomenclature. Authors should avoid using masculine generic forms in their manuscripts. Statements about groups of people should be written in gender-neutral form (See APA manual, 66-7).

 

Language: It is recommended that authors use American English spelling. Standard US American spelling and punctuation as given in Webster’s New Collegiate Dictionary should be followed.

 

Proofs: Proofs of camera-ready articles will be sent to the corresponding author for errors. Changes of content or stylistic changes may only be made in exceptional cases in the proofs.

 Copyright Matters: By submitting an article, the author confirms and guarantees on behalf of him-/herself and any co-authors that the manuscript has not been submitted or published elsewhere, and that he or she holds all copyright in and titles to the submitted contribution, including any figures, photographs, line drawings, plans, maps, sketches, and tables, and that the article and its contents do not infringe in any way on the rights of third parties. The author agrees, upon acceptance of the article for publication, to transfer to the publisher the exclusive right to reproduce and distribute the article and its contents, both physically and in nonphysical, electronic, or other form, in the journal to which it has been submitted and in other independent publications, with no limitations on the number of copies or on the form or the extent of distribution. These rights are transferred for the duration of copyright as defined by international law.

 

Online Rights for Articles appearing in JOPEA: Authors of articles published in JOPEA may post a copy of the final accepted manuscript for non-commercial purposes, as a word-processor, PDF, or other type of file, on their personal web page or on their employer‘s website after it has been accepted for publication.

 

How to become a member of African Interdisciplinary Studies Association (AISA) peer reviewer: because AISA is a professional organization engaged in research, dissemination and mentoring, the editors of the invite individuals, whether members of African Interdisciplinary Studies Association (AISA) or not, to participate in the process of reviewing manuscripts. No remuneration is involved, but you get to participate in shaping scholarship on Africa by providing thoughtful and appropriate comments on research articles and assist editors to make accurate decisions.

 

Journal editors

 

Prof. Maurice N. Amutabi

Prof. Elinami V. Swai

Prof. Winston Jumba Akala

Dr. Linnet Hamasi

Dr. Pamela Wadende

Dr. Magdalene Ndeto Bore

Editorial Advisory Board

 

Prof. Shadrack Nasongo, PhD

Rhodes College

Memphis, Tennessee

USA

 

Prof. Elinami Swai, PhD.

Open University of Tanzania,

Tanzania

 

Prof. Maurice N. Amutabi, PhD.

Lukenya University,

Kenya

 

Prof. John Musalia, PhD.

Northern Kentucky University,

USA

 

Prof. Jan Záhořík, PhD.
University of West Bohemia in Pilsen
Pilsen,

Czech Republic

 

Prof. Ruth N. Otunga, PhD.

University of Eldoret,

Eldoret, Kenya

 

Prof. Frederick Nafukho Muyia, PhD.

Texas A&M University

Texas, USA

 

Prof. Mary Nyangweso-Wangila, PhD.

East Carolina University,

USA

 

Prof. Winston Akala, PhD.

University of Nairobi,

Nairobi, Kenya

 

Prof. Kefa Otiso, PhD.

Bowling Green State University,

Ohio, USA

 

Prof. Eunice Kamaara, PhD.

Moi University

Eldoret,

Kenya

 

Prof. Bongani D. Bantwini, PhD.
North West University

Potchefstroom Campus

South Africa

 

Prof. John Mwaruvie, PhD.

Karatina University, Karatina

Kenya

 

Prof. Edmond Maloba Were, PhD

Kisii University,

Kenya

 

Prof. Frank Khachina Matanga, PhD

Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology,

Kakamega, Kenya

 

Prof. Justus Mbae, PhD

The Catholic University of Eastern Africa,

Nairobi, Kenya

 

Prof. (Eng). Abel Mayaka, PhD

Multimedia University of Kenya,

Nairobi, Kenya

 

Frequently asked questions (FAQ)

How do I submit the paper?

It is essential to email the paper to jopeajournal@gmail.com by the researcher. The manuscript receipt will admit within by our Editorial support staff. In the call for paper page the particulars and information about a specific volume will be available.

 

How much time does it take to complete a review?

Domain experts and domain peers will review and peer review every submission as quickly as possible. Review process will take 7-8 days or more.

 

How many times can one do corrections on a paper before it is published?

This depends on the peer review comments and if they have asked for minor or major revisions. For any correction please contact the editorial team at jopeajournal@gmail.com. The corrections are made using track changes. If it conforms to JOPEA article policies the revised manuscript will be published.

 

What happens if I have not received any JOPEA notification even after 15 days of submission?

Sometimes the notification email may be directed to your spam folder rather than your inbox. It depends on your personal spam settings. If this is not the case, please mention the issue to jopeajournal@gmail.com. You request will be processed within 24 hours.

 

Do I need to submit the copyright form along with the manuscript?

JOPEA will not accept any copyright forms, in case of submission for publication. The copyright belongs to the journal and the article may not be published elsewhere without express permission of the journal.

 

 

Contact us:

Journal of Popular Education in Africa (JOPEA)

African Society for Research on the Education of Adults (ASREA)

P.O. Box 13447 – 00400 Nairobi – Kenya

Cell +254 700 744 545/ +254 729 758 193

Email:  jopeajournal@gmail.com

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Call for Papers for the 8th International Interdisciplinary Conference, to be held in Nairobi, Kenya on June 27 to 30, 2018 at Multimedia University of Kenya

Call for Papers for the 8th International Interdisciplinary Conference, to be held in Nairobi, Kenya on June 27 to 30, 2018 at Multimedia University of Kenya

 

General conference theme: Development from below and from above in Africa

 

Conference Venue: Multimedia University of Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya

 

Sponsors: African Interdisciplinary Studies Association (AISA), Kenya Scholars and Studies Association (KESSA), Centre for Democracy, Research and Development (CEDRED) and Multimedia University of Kenya

 

Africa has been willing and unwilling recipient of many models of development, some of which have been top down while others have been bottom up. Many of these models have been developed outside Africa while others have been generated largely from within the continent. Fifty years after independence, there are many countries in Africa which are still struggling to find which models are suitable to their development needs. They are still looking for way forward in terms of which development models work better. There is an emergence of development models that are hybrids of bottom up and top down in which there is a middle ground. in Kenya for example, the creation of the devolved units at County level is seen as a middle ground, the same to states in Nigeria and some regions in South Africa. The tensions between devolved units and national or federal governments in Africa suggest that hybrids have their own challenges as well. Julius Nyerere’s Ujamaa and Jomo Kenyatta’s Harambee have often been seen as development models from above while others see them as having grassroots origins. What are some of the top down or bottom up development models that have worked successfully in Africa? To what extent are these development models internal or external? How can we determine success of a development model? What are the parameters and characteristics that one needs to look for, to determine success or failure of a development model? What is the way forward? These are some of the questions that the conference organizers hope will be answered by participants.

 

Organized and hosted by African Interdisciplinary Studies Association (AISA) and the Centre for Democracy, Research and Development (CEDRED), this 8th International Interdisciplinary Conference will be held on June 27 to 30, 2018 at Nairobi, Kenya. The conference will bring together scholars from all over the world to make presentations on matters that touch on Africa. Submission of abstracts: Send abstracts of between 250 and 500 words, including full contact details (title, name, address, email-address, and telephone) as well as institutional affiliation by March 30, 2018 to Prof. Maurice N. Amutabi at mauriceamutabi@gmail.com or neddylinnet@gmail.com or Amutabi@yahoo.com or Amutabi@gmail.com  or centredrd@gmail.com

 

The deadline for submission of full papers or PowerPoint presentation is May 30, 2018. Most papers presented at the conference will be selected and published in edited volumes and journals affiliated to African Interdisciplinary Studies Association (AISA) and the Centre for Democracy, Research and Development (CEDRED). The official language of the conference is English. The conference will consist of ten colloquia organized along themes.

 

Important dates

Deadline for submission of abstracts – March 30, 2018

Deadline for submission of PowerPoint presentation or full papers May 30, 2018

Conference dates – June 27-30, 2018

Colloquium 1: Development Approaches and Dynamics in the world

Sub Themes:

  1. Rapid Rural Appraisal (RRA), Project Planning, Project Cycle, ‘Green’ development
  2. Grassroots and Community Based Development Approaches
  3. Development from below – Ujamaa, Harambee, etc
  4. Sector-based Development: Mining, Energy, Water, Pastoralism, Agriculture, Fishing, bee-keeping, Roads, Railways, Air transport, Health, taxi transport (Matatu, Daladala, etc), etc
  5. Urban and Rural Development
  6. Women, Youth and Minority Development
  7. The UN, INGOs, NGOs and Community Based Organizations in Development
  8. Foreign Aid and Western Development models
  9. Eastern Development Activities in Africa- China, India, etc
  10. Poverty Eradication, Poverty Alleviation, Poverty Reduction, Poverty Curse, etc
  11. Millennium Development Goals and Social Development Goals
  12. Social Protection and Corporate Social Responsibility
  13. Religious Organizations and Development
  14. Political Parties, Interest Groups and Development
  15. Philanthropy and Foreign Aid
  16. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

 

Colloquium 2: Environment, Business and Management of Resources

Sub-Themes:

  1. Environment, Climate Change and E-waste Management
  2. Arid and Semi Arid Lands (ASALs)/Rangelands and Development
  3. International Trade, Commerce, e-Commerce and e-Baking
  4. Factories, Industries and Manufacturing
  5. Outsourcing and Africa’s ‘Silicon Valleys’ and ‘Industrial Parks’
  6. European Union, Global Finance and Development
  7. Devolution, Decentralization and Resource Mobilization
  8. Economic Planning and Management of Strategic Natural Resources
  9. Business Management, Human Resource and Entrepreneurship
  10. The Cooperative Movement, Women Groups and Savings Societies
  11. Media, Transport and Communication
  12. Regional Blocs, Integration and Regional Trade
  13. International Trade and Global Business Management
  14. Tourism, Eco-Tourism, Health-Tourism and Development
  15. Transparency and Accountability, Corruption and Ethics in Development
  16. Cable TV, English Premier League, American NBA, Cricket, Rugby and Other Sports
  17. Gambling, Betting and Pyramid schemes in Development
  18. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome.

 

Colloquium 3: Education and Development in Africa

Sub-Themes:

  1. Early Childhood Education, Primary and Secondary Education
  2. Open and Distance Learning (ODL), online learning, e-learning and e-resources
  3. Curriculum Reforms and New Pedagogies in Higher Education
  4. Higher Education, Linkages, Research, Partnerships and Publishing
  5. Industry, Linkages, Exchange Programmes and Collaborations
  6. Special Education
  7. ICT, teleconferencing, webinars, networking and e-Learning
  8. Women, Minorities and Gender mainstreaming in Education
  9. Lifelong Learning, Adult Education and Cooperative Education
  10. Science, Industry, Technology and Education
  11. Private Education and Venture Capital
  12. Technical and Vocational Education
  13. Africa Indigenous Knowledge Systems (IKS)
  14. Research Production, Graduate Training and Repositories and anti-Plagiarism
  15. University Ranking and Funding in Higher Education
  16. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

 

Colloquium 4: Courts, Constitutions and Human Rights

Sub-Themes:

  1. International Court System, Independence of Courts in Africa
  2. Human Rights
  3. Indigenous, Local, National and Global Legal Systems
  4. Conflict Transformation and Peace Building Issues
  5. Dictatorships, Democracies and Constitutional reforms
  6. The role of women and minorities in legal issues
  7. Court reporting and Courts in Social Media
  8. Alternative Justice Systems in Africa – Councils of Elders
  9. Environmental Law and Conservation
  10. Role of Regional Blocs and UN in Arbitration in Conflicts
  11. Women, Youth and Courts
  12. Civic and Citizen Education
  13. Land, Special Courts and Small Claims Courts
  14. Human Trafficking and Global Recruitment Firms
  15. IDPs, Refugees, Illegal and Forced Migration
  16. Protocols, Agreements, Treaties and Accords
  17. Truth Commissions and Restoration of Justice
  18. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

 

Colloquium 5: Engineering, Science and Technology

Sub-Themes:

  1. Highways, Roads, Bridges and Applied Technology
  2. Technical Training, Science, Technology and Development
  3. Agriculture, livestock and fisheries
  4. Engineering and Natural Resource Management
  5. Patents, Trademarks, Technology and Innovation
  6. Manufacturing, Industry and University Collaboration
  7. Research and Development (R&D)
  8. Industrial Parks and Innovation Villages
  9. Innovation, Science, Technology and Environment
  10. ICT, Science and Technology
  11. Science, Technology and Gender
  12. Science, Children and Youth
  13. Health Tourism, Medicine, HIV and AIDS
  14. Transport (Roads, railways, ports nd harbours) and Development
  15. Informal (Jua kali) sector and non formal sector
  16. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

 

Colloquium 6: The Third Sector, Religious Organizations and non State Agencies in Development

Sub-Themes:

  1. The Third Sector and Development
  2. Islam and Christianity and Development
  3. Radical Religious Groups
  4. Media and the Church
  5. Ethics and Development
  6. Faith-Based NGOs
  7. Philanthropy and Development
  8. Religious Institutions and Development
  9. Al Qaeda, Boko Haram, Al Shabaab and global peace and security
  10. NGOs and Grassroots Development
  11. Income generating groups
  12. State corporations
  13. TV and Global Mega Evangelists
  14. Religion and Environment
  15. Religion, Gender and Women
  16. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

 

Colloquium 7: Security, Peace and Conflict

Sub-Themes:

  1. Global Security Architecture and Africa
  2. Al Qaeda, Boko Haram, Al Shabaab and global peace and security
  3. Conflict, Rebel activities, War and Violence
  4. The UN, African Union, Gender and Human Rights
  5. Peace and Security in the Great Lakes Region
  6. Conflict Management
  7. War and Refugees
  8. Ethical Issues in Development
  9. Democracy, Leadership and Governance
  10. Dictatorship, term limits and Corruption
  11. Regional Bodies and peace
  12. Displacement, Refugees and International Affairs
  13. Failed and near-failed states in Africa
  14. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

 

Colloquium 8: Library, Information and Communication Technology

Sub-Themes:

  1. a) Information and Communication Technology (ICT)
  2. b) The nature and state of ICT in the world and Africa
  3. c) Mobile Libraries, Dissemination and publishing
  4. d) Library Resources and Development
  5. e) E-Library/Virtual library
  6. f) E- books/E-Journals
  7. g) Internet Research and online publishing
  8. h) Communication and Journalism
  9. i) Language, FM Radio and TV stations and Development
  10. Gender and ICT in Africa
  11. ICT and environment in Africa
  12. Business innovations in ICT – m-pesa, m-kopa, m-shwari, etc
  13. Oral literature and oral narratives and texts
  14. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

 

Colloquium 9: Interdisciplinary and Multidisciplinary Research on Diverse Fields

Sub-Themes:

  1. Challenges of invention of states and ethnic groups in Africa
  2. Indigenous Knowledge Systems and Development in Africa
  3. Gender, Women and Development in Africa
  4. Corporate Social Responsibility
  5. Aid and Sectoral Development
  6. New Paradigms of Development
  7. Minority Groups and Tensions
  8. Interdisciplinary Research and Development
  9. Public Policy and Ecology
  10. Entrepreneurship and Development
  11. Minorities and Development
  12. Integrated Rural Urban Development
  13. Funding Interdisciplinary Research and Development
  14. Social, Economic and Political Research
  15. Research Regimes
  16. Opinion polls, surveys and mapping in Africa
  17. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

 

Colloquium 10: Roundtables, independent panels and association meetings

Sub-Themes:

  1. Open for any panels or roundtables or association meetings
  2. Any relevant topic

 

Registration Fees:

  1. Staff from East African Universities and Organizations US$ 60 (KES 6,000)
  2. Rest of Africa US$ 150
  3. Rest of the World – Europe, North America, Asia, etc US$ 200
  4. Exhibition and advertising stand – US$ 200

 

Registration fee payments to: African Interdisciplinary Studies Association (AISA), Nairobi, Kenya

ALL GENERAL ENQUIRIES TO BE ADDRESSED TO:

Prof. Maurice N. Amutabi, Convenor and Chair

African Interdisciplinary Studies Association (AISA), Nairobi, Kenya

P.O. Box 13447-00400,

Nairobi, Kenya

E-mail: africanstudiesassociaiton@gmail.com or mauriceamutabi@gmail.com or neddylinnet@gmail.com or Amutabi@yahoo.com or Amutabi@gmail.com

 

 

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Lack of grievance-solving channels responsible for strikes in Kenyan Universities

Lack of grievance-solving channels responsible for strikes in Kenyan Universities

 

By Maurice N. Amutabi

 

We are in that season again when many universities in Kenya are being closed due to student and staff unrest. The causes of the strikes are many and looking at some of them, strikes would have been avoided if there was grievance-articulation platform for students and lecturers. Students grievances and complaints are universal and if not addressed can lead to constant strikes.

 

I studied and worked in two Kenyan universities and witnessed over ten strikes by students and staff. I also studied and worked in two American Universities and witnessed no strike for the same number of years of studying and working there. What ails our Kenyan Institutions that makes them so different from elsewhere?

 

The problem is that we have not developed a democratic culture as a country and are always adversarial like in autocratic systems. There is lack of trust and respect among stakeholders and lack of listening to each other. People go to meetings with fixed minds and not ready to change their positions. There is no dialogue and this frustrates students and staff members.

 

The other problem is that many university managements in Kenya have not modernised in their thinking in this new digital age. Some do not have facebook, whatsup and tweeter accounts and cannot receive grievances from students formally or informally. University Management are so insulated that they rarely meet students and staff.

 

University Managers in Kenya suffer from “big person syndrome” and regard apologising to students or staff as a weakness and rarely want to address them. Some Vice Chancellors have armed body guards. Students have also been made to think that no one likes them and go to meetings with fixed minds with violence written all over their faces.

 

Vice Chancellors are barricaded in their offices with security and many gatekeepers. Seeing a Vice Chancellor is almost impossible. There are multiple screens as one has to pass through security, secretary, personal assistant, Deans, Registrars and Deputy Vice Chancellors. Ideas posted in suggestion boxes are ignored or never addressed.

 

Many Universities in Kenya do not have counselling services and psychological frustrations of students build up to dangerous levels. Poor students do not receive financial aid and bursaries but rich students are given because of corruption. Such students work hard to spoil for everyone because they have not received examination cards or are not able to eat on campus for lack of money.

 

Some universities have removed special and supplementary exams. Therefore students get nervous during exams because they are told if they fail they will do the exam when it will be next offered. This is unfair and yet there is nothing hard in setting special or supplementary exams for such students. The stakes become so high and such students when not prepared well need very small triggers to go on strike.

 

Lecturers are treated so badly that they don’t care what happens to the University. Part time lecturers play an important role in teaching but are treated so badly without offices, identity cards and denied access to staff tea and meals. Some are not give appointment letters. Some are not paid for even a whole year and yet are supposed to be custodians of peace and tranquillity. They can easily incite students against Management.

 

I attended the University of Nairobi in Kenya for about 9 years, from 1986 to 1994 for my bachelor’s degree (1986-1989) and master’s degree (1989-1994). My bachelors’ degree took 4 year instead of 3 years due to strikes. My master’s degree took 6 years instead of 2 years because external examiner took 2 years to bring back his report on my thesis. The University was closed many times during my undergraduate days. I never knew and understood the student grievance channels as an undergraduate or postgraduate. Looking back, some of the strikes would have been averted because the grievances were so mundane and commonsensical that we needed not be sent home.

 

Students request for a tunnel below Uhuru Highway in Nairobi to prevent comrades from being killed, or observing the anniversary for the death of J. M Kariuki in March every year, or demand for more chapattis and meat balls needed not degenerate into strikes. At one time the University was closed for students demanding dialogue with Management. Students’ assembly (kamukunji) almost always ended in closure because anti riot police and GSU were always called in to end the meetings.

 

I taught at Moi University as a lecturer for ten years within which we had as many strikes as there were semesters. Lecturers and students had grievances with Management and those who spoke at such meetings were often victimised. I recall when during UASU meeting with Management we all received sacking letters the following day for being “disrespectful to Management” and were told to reapply and majority were given back our jobs.  I never entered the office of the Vice Chancellor for the 10 years I taught there.

 

In contrast, I attended the University of Illinois in the United States and worked at Central Washington University as a professor and noticed remarkable differences in how students and staff grievances were handled. At the University of Illinois, there were students meetings at Departmental, Faculty and College level. The University had 50,000 students but the University President (VC) found time to meet students from each college once a semester.

 

Students met regularly on the first Friday of every month at Departmental level, and the second Friday at faculty level. Things appeared to flow well and students’ leaders were highly respected and participated in appointment of staff and President and Vice Presidents during interviews and their scores counted.

 

As staff member at Central Washington University, I was impressed by the manner in which staff matters were handled at Departmental, faculty and college level. There were regular meetings on staff and students grievances. Each department had a coffee room where we served free coffee, and space to eat packed lunch. These are important spaces for ventilating. The University President (Vice Chancellor) entered my office not less than ten times on her impromptu visits around campus asking if I had any problems. She invited me for coffee in her office three times. The University had staff retreats just before the beginning and end of semester at which there was a lot of bonding and ventilating. Suggestion boxes were opened every Monday and issues raised by students and staff addressed. During any recruitment for academic staff there was a session with undergraduate and postgraduate students and their input counted.

 

To conclude, Management in Kenyan universities need to realise that times have changed and they cannot afford to ignore stakeholders and sit in their ivory towers in isolation. They are CEOs and must be accountable to stakeholders, in vertical and horizontal way. Holding meetings with staff and students should not be seen as a weakness. They must address issues that touch students urgently such as the death of a student in unclear circumstances. Kenyan universities must create incentives for staff to make them feel wanted and needed.  Staff must be treated with dignity and respect otherwise they will give minimum service.

 

On the other hand, Kenyan University students need to learn from their counter parts in the West and elsewhere and embrace democracy. They should give management time to address their issues. They have to understand that grievances are not addressed through violence and burning down of university property. Destroying property does not solve anything but just adds to the economic burden to stakeholders. They should embrace dialogue. The best solutions are those arrived at through consensus and this is important.

 

Prof. Amutabi is Professor of History, Fulbright Scholar and Vice Chancellor of Lukenya University, Kenya Amutabi@gmail.com

 

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Lack of grievance-solving channels responsible for strikes in Kenyan Universities

Lack of grievance-solving channels responsible for strikes in Kenyan Universities

 

By Maurice N. Amutabi

 

We are in that season again when many universities in Kenya are being closed due to student and staff unrest. The causes of the strikes are many and looking at some of them, strikes would have been avoided if there was grievance-articulation platform for students and lecturers. Students grievances and complaints are universal and if not addressed can lead to constant strikes.

 

I studied and worked in two Kenyan universities and witnessed over ten strikes by students and staff. I also studied and worked in two American Universities and witnessed no strike for the same number of years of studying and working there. What ails our Kenyan Institutions that makes them so different from elsewhere?

 

The problem is that we have not developed a democratic culture as a country and are always adversarial like in autocratic systems. There is lack of trust and respect among stakeholders and lack of listening to each other. People go to meetings with fixed minds and not ready to change their positions. There is no dialogue and this frustrates students and staff members.

 

The other problem is that many university managements in Kenya have not modernised in their thinking in this new digital age. Some do not have facebook, whatsup and tweeter accounts and cannot receive grievances from students formally or informally. University Management are so insulated that they rarely meet students and staff.

 

University Managers in Kenya suffer from “big person syndrome” and regard apologising to students or staff as a weakness and rarely want to address them. Some Vice Chancellors have armed body guards. Students have also been made to think that no one likes them and go to meetings with fixed minds with violence written all over their faces.

 

Vice Chancellors are barricaded in their offices with security and many gatekeepers. Seeing a Vice Chancellor is almost impossible. There are multiple screens as one has to pass through security, secretary, personal assistant, Deans, Registrars and Deputy Vice Chancellors. Ideas posted in suggestion boxes are ignored or never addressed.

 

Many Universities in Kenya do not have counselling services and psychological frustrations of students build up to dangerous levels. Poor students do not receive financial aid and bursaries but rich students are given because of corruption. Such students work hard to spoil for everyone because they have not received examination cards or are not able to eat on campus for lack of money.

 

Some universities have removed special and supplementary exams. Therefore students get nervous during exams because they are told if they fail they will do the exam when it will be next offered. This is unfair and yet there is nothing hard in setting special or supplementary exams for such students. The stakes become so high and such students when not prepared well need very small triggers to go on strike.

 

Lecturers are treated so badly that they don’t care what happens to the University. Part time lecturers play an important role in teaching but are treated so badly without offices, identity cards and denied access to staff tea and meals. Some are not give appointment letters. Some are not paid for even a whole year and yet are supposed to be custodians of peace and tranquillity. They can easily incite students against Management.

 

I attended the University of Nairobi in Kenya for about 9 years, from 1986 to 1994 for my bachelor’s degree (1986-1989) and master’s degree (1989-1994). My bachelors’ degree took 4 year instead of 3 years due to strikes. My master’s degree took 6 years instead of 2 years because external examiner took 2 years to bring back his report on my thesis. The University was closed many times during my undergraduate days. I never knew and understood the student grievance channels as an undergraduate or postgraduate. Looking back, some of the strikes would have been averted because the grievances were so mundane and commonsensical that we needed not be sent home.

 

Students request for a tunnel below Uhuru Highway in Nairobi to prevent comrades from being killed, or observing the anniversary for the death of J. M Kariuki in March every year, or demand for more chapattis and meat balls needed not degenerate into strikes. At one time the University was closed for students demanding dialogue with Management. Students’ assembly (kamukunji) almost always ended in closure because anti riot police and GSU were always called in to end the meetings.

 

I taught at Moi University as a lecturer for ten years within which we had as many strikes as there were semesters. Lecturers and students had grievances with Management and those who spoke at such meetings were often victimised. I recall when during UASU meeting with Management we all received sacking letters the following day for being “disrespectful to Management” and were told to reapply and majority were given back our jobs.  I never entered the office of the Vice Chancellor for the 10 years I taught there.

 

In contrast, I attended the University of Illinois in the United States and worked at Central Washington University as a professor and noticed remarkable differences in how students and staff grievances were handled. At the University of Illinois, there were students meetings at Departmental, Faculty and College level. The University had 50,000 students but the University President (VC) found time to meet students from each college once a semester.

 

Students met regularly on the first Friday of every month at Departmental level, and the second Friday at faculty level. Things appeared to flow well and students’ leaders were highly respected and participated in appointment of staff and President and Vice Presidents during interviews and their scores counted.

 

As staff member at Central Washington University, I was impressed by the manner in which staff matters were handled at Departmental, faculty and college level. There were regular meetings on staff and students grievances. Each department had a coffee room where we served free coffee, and space to eat packed lunch. These are important spaces for ventilating. The University President (Vice Chancellor) entered my office not less than ten times on her impromptu visits around campus asking if I had any problems. She invited me for coffee in her office three times. The University had staff retreats just before the beginning and end of semester at which there was a lot of bonding and ventilating. Suggestion boxes were opened every Monday and issues raised by students and staff addressed. During any recruitment for academic staff there was a session with undergraduate and postgraduate students and their input counted.

 

To conclude, Management in Kenyan universities need to realise that times have changed and they cannot afford to ignore stakeholders and sit in their ivory towers in isolation. They are CEOs and must be accountable to stakeholders, in vertical and horizontal way. Holding meetings with staff and students should not be seen as a weakness. They must address issues that touch students urgently such as the death of a student in unclear circumstances. Kenyan universities must create incentives for staff to make them feel wanted and needed.  Staff must be treated with dignity and respect otherwise they will give minimum service.

 

On the other hand, Kenyan University students need to learn from their counter parts in the West and elsewhere and embrace democracy. They should give management time to address their issues. They have to understand that grievances are not addressed through violence and burning down of university property. Destroying property does not solve anything but just adds to the economic burden to stakeholders. They should embrace dialogue. The best solutions are those arrived at through consensus and this is important.

 

Prof. Amutabi is Professor of History, Fulbright Scholar and Vice Chancellor of Lukenya University, Kenya Amutabi@gmail.com

 

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