Tribute to Prof. Joseph Nyasani

Tribute to Prof. Joseph Nyasani

By Maurice N. Amutabi

Kisii University, Kenya and the world, are mourning the death of yet another academic giant, Prof. Joseph Nyasani. I first met Prof. Joseph Nyasani at the University of Nairobi in 1986 where he taught me philosophy, essentially metaphysics. He was brilliant and his lectures were exciting. He was the quintessential professor, without ethnic overtones, regionalism and any negative isms. He was simply, Kenyan. He easily stood out by his demeanour and style. He was a familiar face on campus, easily recognised by many students and staff, because he worked part time as news anchor at the Kenya Broadcasting Corporation (KBC) TV station, the only TV station in the country at the time. He was a kind of celebrity.

Prof. Nyasani was fluent and articulate in ten languages and was proud of his English pronunciation. He pronounced words with deliberate flare and academic exuberance. He knew how to dress, always in a suit and a tie, mainly three piece suits. He drove a Mercedes Benz at a time when it was a prestigious machine and students looked forward to such role models at a time when many lecturers drove Volkswagen beetles and old Peugeot 404s and 504s. He came across as simple and approachable. He liked to share his space with ordinary mortal and mixed freely with hoi polloi. He was a member of the Senior Common Room at the University of Nairobi but not a frequent visitor of the place.

Together with the late Prof. Odera Oruka, Prof. Nyasani made philosophy a vibrant discipline at the University of Nairobi. Philosophy was often disparaged and many first years were discouraged from studying philosophy beyond first year, but Nyasani and Oruka inspired many to pursue philosophy. Prof. Nyasani was among few lecturers who taught who would come to a lecture and make long quotes from his own words. He loved St. Augustine and The City of God, from which he quoted rather generously. He mentioned many Popes whom he insisted were black and pointed out the pioneer role of African philosophy in creation of knowledge in the world.

Prof. Nyasani was a deconstructionist and loved to put everything upside down in order to understand it better. He did not take anything one said at face value. There were always many meanings to what we said or did not say. He always questioned any claims including the truth and often asked us to discuss why truth is called truth and if there were hierarchies of truth. He asked tough questions and told us that he did not have answers and neither would we even by the time we all died. He was always in control of his class and was at his best when talking away from his lecture notes, then he would get so excited and start stomping around the stage in animated excitement but would soon realise he had lost some of us, and then would come back home, to continue from where he had stopped.

There are many professors who do not know how to teach but Prof. Nyasani was among the few exceptions. He knew how to tell stories and also engage in academic debates and discourses without getting personal. He told jokes and liked to provoke people into great debates. He rarely got riled. He told us about the colonial days and how African philosophy was marginalized. He was among many scholars that played an important role in recovering and reconstructing African knowledge systems, many of which had been undermined by the colonial project. He rejected notions of cultural profiling, legitimating and straight-jacketing.

In his early life, Prof. Nyasani trained to be a priest but quit on the eve of his ordination. The major conviction and counsel from Prof. Nyasani was that knowledge liberates humans. He believed that everyone at the University should study philosophy besides their other disciplines. He thought that philosophy should be made compulsory in all universities, like was the case in ancient Europe and most American universities, in order for people to arrive at logical answers. His reason was that students and professors made hollow arguments which were not guided by underpinning philosophies and principles and ended up engaging in meaningless diatribes and discourses. He was disheartened by people he called ‘ignorant’ (referred in normal conversation as fools) for they had refused to read and be informed. He refrained from engaging in polemical arguments and would simply switch off and let you go on in ignorant rants, alone. Then he would start again by saying, “So, what we were saying…..

Prof. Nyasani was a national leader and served as the first Chairman of the Kisii University Council, a role he served with great distinction. He is the reason that Management of Kisii University has a national face compared to management teams of other universities. He believed that a national university such as Kisii University should have the face of Kenya. He believed in merit and not selfish religious demagoguery and creation of clan or ethnic enclaves. He was one of our keynote speakers at the 2013 1st Kisii University Annual International Interdisciplinary conference where he impressed. This was perhaps his last official function at Kisii University.

Many of our lecturers at the University of Nairobi relaxed and had their happy hours at the Senior Common Room (SCR) in Ghandi Wing, but where Prof. Nyasani did not like. The Senior Common Room was prestigious and it was where you met who was who in academia in Kenya, but was also a place where there was a lot of academic bullying and grandstanding. There was always a guard at the door who demanded membership card before you were allowed to enter. In the Senior Common Room, anyone below the position of lecturer such as tutorial fellows and graduate teaching assistants could not order for anything unless accompanied by a lecturer, or PhD holder. If you wanted to host a non member at SCR, you had to notify the chairman in writing. There were rumours that Government and University management had spies in the place that picked all manner of rumours as intelligence for them and that is how people like Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Mukaru Ng’ang’a, Katam Mkangi, Maina wa Kinyatti, E.S Atieno Odhiambo and others were identified as leftists and identified for detention. I believe these are some of the reasons that made Prof. Nyasani to stay away, usually spending his social hours in Nairobi West.

Prof. Nyasani produced many scholars. My classmates such as Prof. Michael Ntabo (Rongo University College), Prof. Mary Ngare (Moi University) and Dr. Patrick Maison Dikirr (Technical University of Kenya) later took philosophy up to PhD level and now lecturing in many universities. Among his mentees is, Dr. Erick Thomas Ogwora, the Dean of Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at Kisii University. Unlike some Kenyan professors who die without producing a single professor, Nyasani has left many and he will be remembered for this great capacity to mentor

Prof. Joseph Nyasani will be laid to rest on March 16 2016 at his ancestral home at Nyabururu in Kisii County. We ask God to keep his spirit alive in many of his scholarly books and articles in years to come so that others can gain from his intellectual contributions.

Prof. Amutabi is Deputy Vice-Chancellor for Academic and Students’ Affairs at Kisii University.

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Call for Papers for the Third Annual International Interdisciplinary Conference, to be held at Nairobi Campus of Kisii University, Kenya on June 22 to 25, 2016

Call for Papers for the Third Annual International Interdisciplinary Conference, to be held at Nairobi Campus of Kisii University, Kenya on June 22 to 25, 2016

General conference theme: “Rethinking Development Paradigms by Africa and its Partners”
Conference Venue: Nairobi Campus, Kisii University, Kenya
Sponsors: Kisii University and Kenya Scholars and Studies Association (KESSA)

Africa has been at the centre of many and sometimes competing and experimental development paradigms, both from within and outside. Since 1960s, African governments have developed various development plans and blue prints, all aimed at producing the best for their people. In the 1960s, the focus was on massive development projects that were meant to produce multiple benefits. Examples included Akosombo in Ghana, Kariba in Zambia, Masinga in Kenya, among others, which were meant to generate electricity, provide water for irrigation, produce fish and serve as reservoirs for water supply. Paper presenters will be expected to look from within in order to interrogate the success and some of the challenges these development paradigms have faced in light of external influence. Scholars will be expected to pay attention to Africa’s development partners who come to the Continent with their own development proposals and agenda. Researchers should critically examine models and approaches presented for development in health, education, tourism, mining, agriculture, water, livestock development, roads, railway and air transport, development of arid and semi arid lands, science and technology, engineering, environment, urban and rural development, vulnerable groups, minorities, women and children. How sound are development plans developed by African governments? In what ways have they been successful? Whose development and in whose interest? How should development in Africa proceed? Who should be involved in Africa’s development and why? Are Africa’s development partners genuine? What projects should Africa pursue? These are the type of questions that papers are invited to explore.

Organized and hosted by the Office of the Deputy Vice Chancellor and other faculties at Kisii University, this Third Interdisciplinary International Conference will be held between June 22 to 25, 2016 at Nairobi Campus, of Kisii University, Kenya. Submission of abstracts: Send abstracts of between 250 and 500 words, including full contact details (title, name, address, email-address, and telephone) as well as institutional affiliation by March 30, 2016 to Prof. Maurice N. Amutabi at mauriceamutabi@gmail.com or Amutabi@yahoo.com or hlinnet@yahoo.com

The deadline for submission of full papers is May 30, 2016. Most papers presented at the conference will be selected and published in edited volumes and journals affiliated to Kisii University. The official language of the conference is English. The conference will consist of ten colloquia organized along themes.

Colloquium 1: Service Sectors, Politics and Development in Africa
Sub Themes:
a. Social Protection in Africa
b. Energy, Water, Agriculture and Development
c. Health and Development
d. Heritage, Culture and Development
e. Urban and Rural Development
f. Gender Dynamics and Women in Africa
g. Politics and Governance in Africa
h. Hollywood, Bollywood, Nollywood, Kenywood, hip hop, etc
i. The language question in Africa
j. Poverty, Deprivation and Vulnerability
k. Peace, Conflict and Security issues
l. IDPs and Refugee Crisis in Africa
m. Economic Development in Africa
n. Civil Society, NGOs and Social Movements in Africa
o. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome.

Colloquium 2: Management of Resources in Africa
Sub-Themes:
a. Exploitation of Strategic Resources in Africa
b. International Trade, Commerce, e-Commerce and e-Baking
c. Industry and Manufacturing in Africa
d. Outsourcing and Africa’s ‘Silicon Valleys’ and ‘Industrial Parks’
e. Global Finance and Development
f. Environment, Climate Change and E-waste
g. Planning and Mmanagement of Natural Resources
h. Business Management, Human Resource and Entrepreneurship
i. The Cooperative Movement and Savings Societies in Africa
j. Media, Transport and Communication in Africa
k. Trade and regional blocs
l. Global Business Management
m. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome.

Colloquium 3: Education and Development in Africa
Sub-Themes:
a. Education, Research, Science and Development
b. Open and Distance Learning and Education
c. Curriculum Reforms and New Pedagogies in Africa
d. Higher Education, Partnerships and Publishing
e. Exchange Programmes and Linkages
f. Evaluation and Education Reforms
g. ICT and e-Learning
h. Open and Distance Education
i. Lifelong Learning and Adult Education in Africa
j. Industry, Technology and Education
k. Private Education, Early Learning and Special Education
l. Technical and Vocational Education
m. Primary Education, Education and Poverty Alleviation
o. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

Colloquium 4: Judiciary, Constitutionalism and Human Rights
Sub-Themes:
a. Judicial Reforms and Human Rights in Africa
b. International Trade and New Maritime Laws
c. Local and Global Networks
d. Cohesion and Integration Issues
e. New Constitutional reforms
f. Judiciary and Corruption
g. ICT and Law
h. Alternative Legal Systems and Structures
i. Environmental Law and Conservation
j. Dealing with Global Outlaws
k. Global Legal Education
l. Civic and Citizen Education
m. Special Courts and Small Claims Courts
n. Global Recruitment Firms in Africa
o. Illegal and Forced Migration
p. Mineral Treaties and Agreements
q. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

Colloquium 5: Engineering, Science and Technology in Africa
Sub-Themes:
a. Science and Natural Resource Management
b. Collaborations in Science, Technology and Development
c. Agriculture, livestock and fisheries
d. Engineering and Training in Science and Technology
e. Science, Technology and Innovation
f. Industry and University Collaboration
g. Research and Development (R&D)
h. Developing Patents and Trademarks
i. innovation, Science, Technology and Environment
j. ICT, Science and Technology
k. Science, Gender and Women
m. Science, Children and Youth
n. Health, Medicine HIV and AIDS
o. Health Tourism
p. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

Colloquium 6: Religion, NGOs and non-State Agencies in Development in Africa
Sub-Themes:
a. Radicalization, Islam and Christianity in Africa
b. Radical Religious Groups in Africa
c. Media and the Church in Africa
d. Ethics and Development in Africa
e. Theology and Development in Africa
f. Faith-Based NGOs
h. Religious Institutions and Development
i. The Church and the State
m. Global Mega Evangelists
n. Religion and Environmental Issues
o. Religion, Gender and Women in Africa
p. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

Colloquium 7: Security, Peace and Conflict in Africa
Sub-Themes:
a. Africa Security Architecture
b. Peace and Security in the Great Lakes Region
c. Conflict, War and Violence in Africa
d. Human Rights
e. Peace Education
f. Conflict management
g. Refugees in Africa
h. Ethical Issues in Development
i. Leadership and Governance
j. Corruption in Africa
k. Regional Bodies and peace in Africa
l. Cold Peace and Warm Peace in Africa
m. Failed and near-failed states in Africa
n. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

Colloquium 8: Library, Information and Communication Technology
Sub-Themes:
a) Information and Communication Technology in Africa
b) Architecture of ICT in Africa
c) Disseminations and publication
d) Library resources
e) E-Library/Virtual library
f) E- books/E-Journals
g) Internet Research
h) Communication and Journalism
i) Databases
j. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

Colloquium 9: Interdisciplinary and Multidisciplinary Research in Africa
Sub-Themes:
a. Indigenous Knowledge Systems and Development
b. Deconstructing Development
c. Gender, Women and Development
d. Corporate Social Responsibility
e. Aid and Sectoral Development
f. New Paradigms of Development
g. Minority Groups and Tensions
h. Interdisciplinary Research
i. Public Policy and Ecology
j. Entrepreneurship and Development
k. Gender and Development
l. Integrated Rural Urban Development
m. Environment and Development
n. Social and Economic Research
o. Research Regimes
p. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

Colloquium 10: Roundtables, independent panels and association meetings
Sub-Themes:
a. Open for any panels or roundtables
b. Any relevant topic

Registration Fees:
1. Staff and students from the Kisii University (KSU) KShs.5000
2. Staff and students from other universities in Kenya KShs.6, 000
3. Staff from East African Universities and Organizations KShs.6, 500
4. Rest of Africa US$ 150
5. Rest of the World – Europe, North America, Asia, etc US$ 200

Registration fee payments to: Kenya Studies and Scholars Association (KESSA) or Kisii University (KSU) (Attn: 3rd Annual International Interdisciplinary Conference)

ALL GENERAL ENQUIRIES TO BE ADDRESSED TO:
Prof. Maurice N. Amutabi, Convenor
Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic and Students Affairs),
Kisii University,
P.O BOX 408-40200, Kisii, Kenya
Tel: + 254-058-30826
E-mail: mauriceamutabi@gmail.com or amutabi@yahoo.com or hlinnet@yahoo.com

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Prof. Chris Wanjala Responds to My Apology to Prof. Amuka

Chris Lukorito Wanjala Prof Peter Amuka and I had the option to have a conversation with the Kisii audience about what we knew about Ngugi’s ideas from the past and the present as enunciated in his lecture and to bolster the points he made in his speech or to talk over the subject of his lecture and show that we knew as much as he did or more and thus dash some of the things he said in his lecture to pieces and thus cause a furore.I presume these were our choices as discussants or “discussers” of his lecture.Given that we had traveled to Kisii University as a team and we had gone over the issues he raised in his lecture,it would have been absurd to engage him in arguments.Moreover,the event was not a symposium or a colloquium where different papers are presented and different perspectives are elicited concerning the topic on hand. This was a one man’s show and we were there to appreciate him and cheer him. That is what Prof Akama did; what the Rt.Honorable Raila Odinga did, and what we did as discussants. There is a Bukusu word called “Khukhangarana” .We were not in Kisii to engage in “kamakhangarano ” with Professor Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o’. Remember though that Ngugi was my lecturer of English between 1968 and 1969 .As I said in my comments as a discussant, Ngugi resigned his post as lecturer in the Department of English at the University College Nairobi and left me as he went to Makerere University College as a Writer in Residence there ,when I was a First year at the University College Nairobi.He came back around 1972 when I had already graduated and taken up teaching as an Assistant Lecturer.He took over the reins of the Department in 1973,and recommended Dr Eddah Gachukia and I for appointments as Lecturers in the Department and we became his lieutenants in the revolution that was taking place in the Literature Department – University of Nairobi. As a participant in the revolution that he spearheaded how was I to engage in Kamakhangarano at Kisii University on what we did together to abolish the English Department ?Professor Maurice Amutabi , with all due respect as our wonderful host, got our roles as discussants of Professor Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o’s lecture totally wrong.

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I apologize to Prof. Amuka and blame my aging ears

I apologise to Prof. Amuka and blame my aging ears

By Maurice N. Amutabi

In his remarks as a discussant at Prof. Ngugi wa Thiong’o’os recent public lecture at Kisii University, I thought I heard Prof. Peter Amuka confessing that they drank muratina at Prof. Ngugi wa Thinog’o’os home at Kamirriithu, Limuru., but he says they drank tea instead. I was surprised when I was inundated by calls on the morning of Saturday September 26, 2015 telling me to read the Saturday Nation where Prof. Amuka had called me a liar. On page 34 of the Saturday Nation, I read the heading, “Of Great Ngugi Event and lots of Don’s lies,” with the catch line caption reading “Contrary to claims by Prof. Amutabi, we were served lots of tea at the author’s Kamiriithu home, not muratina.” This was inaccurate and erroneous. I would like to apologise to Prof. Peter Amuka, for my bad hearing and misreporting that as students, they drank muratina at Prof. Ngugi wa Thinog’o’os home. I did not hear properly and did not mean to embarrass or demean the great professor, but did not lie.

I am old, and when one gets to be half a century and older, our ears and eyes begin to fail us. It is therefore possible that I heard mutatina instead of tea, and would like to apologise most profusely to him, his friends and relatives. However, allow to wonder a bit, about the accuracy of Prof. Amuka’s reaction, because the caption talked of lies and I looked for other ‘lies’ that I had told and did not see any other mistake from my hearing. Perhaps saying that my reporting on this one thing was inaccurate would have been fair, but calling it lies is inaccurate and gross exaggeration. I know Prof. Amuka quite well as a teetotaller, having worked with him at Moi University for ten years in the 1990s, and was equally surprised by the apparent confession and that is why I found it curious, that he had imbibed muratina as a university student.

Now, allow me to state that my reportage on Ngugi’s public lecture was not just about this one sentence that Prof. Amuka decided to focus on. Yes, they drank tea and not muratina, but was that really important? Was that part of what Prof. Ngugi wa Thiong’o had shared in his public lecture? We expected the discussants to break down Ngugi’s presentation, deconstruct, locate and contextuaoise his presentation and not take us through memory lane, about the glorious days at hte University of Nairobi. That was indeed my point of contention. My contention was that the discussants of Ngugi wa Thiong’o were his former students, Prof. Chris Wanjala of the University of Nairobi and Prof. Peter Amuka of Moi University. The two were clearly mesmerised for meeting their lecturer after many years and ended up taking the audience through memory lane, occasionally lapsing into nostalgia, about the good old days instead of breaking down for the audience and therefore not creating the intense debate that many anticipated.

Prof. Wanjala talked about how Ngugi was the only African lecturer in the Department of English studies at the University of Nairobi when he joined the institution as an undergraduate in the 1960s. He shared with the audience the changes that Ngugi brought about in the curriculum of Literature, and created new courses that were very Afro-centric replacing the Euro-centric curriculum, besides changing the name of the department. The praising by both scholars went a little overboard, embellishing and sanitising Ngugi. Prof. Wanjala’s came across as flat, restrained, without his usual punch lines, academic arrogance and vibrancy. Instead we saw a laid back, conforming forlorn figure, praising the hero.

Prof. Amuka reminded the audience about Ngugi’s generosity to him as a student, and how Ngugi prevailed upon him to drop Russian literature instead pursue African literature, asking him to start at home first. He mentioned many academic heavyweights in Kenya who went through the hands of Ngugi. Like Prof. Wanjala, we did not see Amuka fire academic missiles the Ngugi way as he is always know to do. I can imagine myself discussing the work of my teachers at the University of Nairobi such as Prof. Godfrey Muriuki, Prof. Henry Mutoro, Prof. Mwangi wa Githumo, Prof. V. G Simiyu, Prof. Korwa Adar, among others. I would probably be very generous to them and remind them about our good old days.

I support celebration of African culture but I am not sold on the idea of embellishing local languages, and seeing them as panaceas to all our development problems. We know that Ngugi wa Thiong’o is famous for novels such as The River Between and A Grain of Wheat and Wizard of the Crow. The first two novels rank highly on the amazon book sellers list and Wizard of the Crow is the lowest. Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe is the most famous novel in Africa and was written in English and not Chinua Achebe’s Igbo language.

I do not blindly support indigenous languages for the sake of it. As a historian, I am not so emotional and wedded to the idea of recovering and reviving dying languages because there are more languages which died in the past than those in the world today. Aramaic, the language that Jesus spoke, Ethiopian Ge’ez (world’s first written language), Latin and others are referred to as ‘dead’ languages because they remain only in academic realms. They have been replaced by new languages. That is just how history is. I don’t think I would spend sleepless nights because my kids cannot speak Luhya, my mother tongue with the fluency in which I speak it. They are global citizens with much bigger environment to operate in compared to my world in the 1970s while growing up in Western Kenya, drinking tea. I find them more fluent in English and Kiswahili than me and for obvious reasons and have no problem with it. I was weaned in River Mumboko, where I drank and bathed in cold unprocessed water, ate white ants, raw cassava and sweet potatoes, wild fruits and leaves for lunch, which if they tried they might have all kinds of aches.

If a language is dying, it means it has no speakers and recovering it adds no value to humanity. There are many MCAs who speak their local languages but there are some who cannot speak them. I have colleagues who cannot speak their indigenous languages but can speak Kiswahili and English and are comfortable about it. Why would I force them to speak a local language, spoken by 2000 people in some remote village in Kenya? Kiswahili is spoken by 500 million people in Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Malawi, Mozambique, D R Congo, Zambia, Somalia, Mauritius, Seychelles, Aden, Oman and South Sudan, while English is spoken by 3.5 billion people. Prof. Ngugi wa Thiong’o may need to revisit his ideas on language in view of the changing global linguistic dynamics where we are talking about one global language that will combine aspects of all languages.

Prof. Amutabi is the Deputy Vice Chancellor (Academic and Students’ Affairs) at Kisii University, Kenya. Amutabi@yahoo.com

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Prof. Ngugi wa Thiong’o Ignited passion in the Audience at Kisii University

Prof. Ngugi wa Thiong’o Ignited passion in the Audience at Kisii University

By Maurice N. Amutabi

Kisii University enjoyed one of the most high voltage academic activities on August 31, 2015 which has never been witnessed before on campus. They came in their thousands to listen to Prof. Ngugi wa Thiong’o at Kisii University on August 1, 2015 at the Main Library. The place was crowded and one could feel the academic ‘Holy Spirit’ in the air, as the audience waited for the arrival of Kenya’s most famous public intellectual. There was tremendous amount of expectation as academic staff, students and the general public came out in large numbers to listen to this great icon and famous author. Ngugi did not disappoint. He was introduced by Vice Chancellor Prof. John S. Akama and his lecture covered three important issues – one, the need for Africans to love and promote their languages; two, the need to recognise our heroes such as Otenyo and Koitalel arap Samoei; third, need for decolonization, calling on intellectuals to actively engage in research that promotes African values while at the same time engaging the state in matters of development in order to hold the state accountable.

Prof. Ngugi wa Thiong’o was very passionate about language issues in Africa, which has appeared in many of his intellectual works in the past. He was in his true elements when he stood up to address the audience. In what many scholars know, Ngugi revisited his pet subject on language. Ngugi revisited the language question, asking Kenyans not to forget their local languages. He pointed out that many civilizations that endured for many generations often preserved their cultures through their own languages. He faulted the current lack of commitment and passion for African languages. He encouraged the use of African languages as a way of promoting our cultures. He said promoting local languages would not necessarily promote negative ethnicity. The chief executive officer of East African Educational Publishers Kiarie Kamau listed many books which Ngugi has published in Agikuyu language.

Despite having lived abroad for many years, Ngugi remains passionate about Kenyan nationalism and his patriotic side was obvious. Ngugi ignited passion in the audience, by his demand for the return of the head of Otenyo, the leader of Abagusii resistance who was beheaded by the colonial DC of Kisii District Mr. Northcott in 1908. Ngugi was not amused by the fact that Kenyans have not been loud enough in demanding for the return of the heads of resistance heroes such as Otenyo and Koitalel Arap Samoei which remain in Britain many years after independence. How far have we gone in demanding for the head of Otenyo? He said Otenyo was a national hero and should be honoured alongside Dedan Kimathi and others who stood firm against colonial oppression.

Ngugi was witty and critical as he talked about his life in detention and how his only friend behind bars was ‘imagination’ which his jailers could not take away. He told us how he used prison toilet paper to write two books which were published soon after he was released. Ngugi has published 40 books, two of which are based on his experiences in detention. He said that his friendship with Raila Odinga was made closer by the visit he received from Jaramogi Oginga Odinga soon after he was released from detention at Kamiirithu. He was pleasantly surprised by the visit and forever realized that despite the incarceration, there were some friends who did not forsake him.

One of the surprise guests at the public lecture was Raila Amolo Odinga, the leader of opposition in Kenya, who shared many jokes about his history with Ngugi wa Thiong’o going back to their days at the University of Nairobi where he briefly taught in the 1970s. He referred to Ngugi and himself as holding a ‘degree’ called PG or Prison Graduates. He said that Ngugi’s prison diary, Detained made him to survive detention. Raila shared with Ngugi wa Thiong’o the need to recognise local languages and both thought that it would be interesting to have Members of County Assembles (MCAs) debate in their local languages in County Assemblies. The problem with this suggestion is that not all counties in Kenya have single ethnic groups residing in them and MCAs come from different ethnic groups.

The discussants of Ngugi wa Thiong’o were his former students, Prof. Chris Wanjala of the University of Nairobi and Prof. Peter Amuka of Moi University. They did good commentaries on Ngugi’s lecture but were not critical enough. We realized too late that it was not easy for students to critique their teacher. The two were clearly mesmerised for meeting their lecturer after many years and ended up taking the audience through memory lane, occasionally lapsing into nostalgia, about the good old days. Wanjala talked about how Ngugi was the only African lecturer in the Department of English studies at the University of Nairobi when he joined the institution as an undergraduate in the 1960s. He shared with the audience the changes that Ngugi brought about in the curriculum of Literature, and created new courses that were very Afro-centric replacing the Euro-centric curriculum, besides changing the name of the department. Wanjala’s came across as flat because his usual punch lines, academic arrogance and vibrancy were lacking. Instead we saw and heard a forlorn figure, praising the hero.

Prof. Amuka also shared with the audience about the good old days, when as students they often took rides in Ngugi’s Peugeot 404 and time and again went to his house in Kamiriithu to drink muratina. Prof. Amuka reminded the audience about Ngugi’s generosity to him as a student, and how Ngugi prevailed upon him to drop Russian literature to African literature, asking him to start at home first. He mentioned many academic heavyweights in Kenya who went through the hands of Ngugi. Like Prof. Wanjala, we did not see Amuka fire academic missiles the Ngugi way as he is always know to do. The two scholars were timid and did little criticism but pay homage to their hero, and we understand this. I can imagine myself discussing the work of my teachers at the University of Nairobi Prof. Godfrey Muriuki, Prof. Henry Mutoro, Prof. Mwangi wa Githumo, Prof. V. G Simiyu, Prof. Korwa Adar, among others. I would probably be very generous to them and remind them about our good old days.

I thought that Prof. Ngugi wa Thiong’o came out as a little bit casual in the manner in which he examined the language question, especially his recommendation. He suggested that we go back to our local languages, paradoxically stating so in English. I know Ngugi tried this and wrote some of his books in Agikuyu language which did not make it to the best seller lists until they were translated to English. My thinking is that if we would like to have our own African impact on global language stage, we can promote the use of one African language such as Kiswahili, Zulu, Luganda or Chichewa, or Twi or Joloff or any other that the African Union can agree on. We are living in a global world in which we must speak global languages in order to compete globally. Children can be taught in their local languages, but must also be taught global languages and I don’t think the two are mutually exlusive.

As a historian, I am not so emotional and wedded to the idea of recovering and reviving dying languages because there are more languages which died in the past than those in the world today. Aramaic, the language that Jesus spoke, Ethiopian Ge’ez (world’s first written language), Latin and others are referred to as ‘dead’ languages because they remain only in academic realms. They have been replaced by new languages. That is just how history is. I don’t think I would spend sleepless nights because my kids cannot speak Luhya, my mother tongue with the fluency in which I speak it. They are global citizens with much bigger environment to operate in compared to my world in the 1970s while growing up in Western Kenya. I find them more fluent in English and Kiswahili than me and for obvious reasons. I was weaned in River Mumboko, where I drank and bathed in cold unprocessed water, ate white ants, raw cassava and sweet potatoes, wild fruits and leaves for lunch, which if they tried they might have all kinds of aches.

If a language is dying, it means it has no speakers and recovering it adds no value. There are many MCAs who speak their local languages but there are some who cannot speak them. I have colleagues who cannot speak their languages but can speak Kiswahili and English and are comfortable about it. Why would I force them to speak a local language, spoken by 2000 people in some remote village in Kenya? Kiswahili is spoken by 500 million people in Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Malawi, Mozambique, D R Congo, Zambia, Somalia, Mauritius, Seychelles, Aden, Oman and South Sudan, while English is spoken by 3.5 billion people.

On the demand for the return of the heads of Otenyo and Koitalel Samoei to Kenya, Ngugi was spot on and I totally support the idea because it has a symbolic meaning and nationalistic appeal. These are our heroes as Kenyans because they made the colonisers know that Kenya had its owners. In 1994 President Nelson Mandela initiated the demand for the return of the remains of Sarah Bartman, the Khoikhoi girl who had been captured by Europeans at the age of 18, taken to Europe in 1895 because of her unique posterior and big breasts. She was displayed in cages in shows and exhibitions in Paris and London where men touched her posterior and genitalia for curiosity and died at the 26. Her genitalia was cut off and preserved in a jar. Her body was returned to a hero’s welcome in South Africa in 1994 and given state burial.

In Ethiopia, the giant iron obelisk stolen by Benito Mussolini’s forces when they invaded Ethiopia in 1936 was returned in 2005 after Prime Minister Meles Zenawi demanded for it. We should demand return of heads, our artefacts and heritage. I saw more artefacts on Africa at the Smithsonian Museum in Washington DC in 2000 than any African museum I have visited. It is a shame that we have not taken care of the Joseph Murumbi collections which now lie in waste at the Kenyan National Archives. Our children should be able to see our rich past of indigenous grinding stones, thistles and pestles, guards, pots, dishes and culinary tastes, clothes and other artefacts in order to stimulate their imagination and drive for invention and discovery.

The question and answer session was interesting and Ngugi wa Thiong’o was asked many questions by the audience. Members in the audience asked him about his previous and present positions on issues such as using vernacular and not English in intellectual debates and if this was not fatalistic. He was asked if he was rich as a result of his many books. Others asked him why he “killed” Muthoni the cultural heroine in his novel The River Between, and not Nyambura the cultural traitor, while one asked him why many of his novels ended in suspense. Ngugi responded to the questions quite eloquently to the satisfaction of the audience. Kisii University will be holding its annual international conference in Nairobi from June 24-27, 20016 and Ngugi was approached to provide keynote address. Kisii University community promised never to look back and carry on the intellectual fire that was lit by Prof. Ngugi wa Thiong’o.

Prof. Amutabi is the Deputy Vice Chancellor (Academic and Students’ Affairs) at Kisii University, Kenya. Amutabi@yahoo.com

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Ngugi wa Thiong’o set for lecture at Kisii University – Kisii County News

Ngugi wa Thiong’o set for lecture at Kisii University

source: http://www.hivisasa.com/kisii/education/76163

The announcement that renowned scholar Prof Ngugi wa Thiong’o plans to visit Kisii University on August 31 has been received with excitement by students and staff from the institution.

On Tuesday, deputy vice chancellor Prof Maurice Amutabi revealed that the US-based novelist will be giving a lecture at the legendary Dr Sagini Hall on the last day of this month on matters diplomacy and good governance.

Students, led by chairman Rodgers Nyanumba, hailed the renowned author for sparing his busy schedule to address them as the means of motivating the learners.

“We are very happy that he (Ngugi) will be coming to our institution,” student leader Nyanumba said.

“The journey was long overdue and we are very motivated with the topic he will be covering. African nations are struggling with their leadership and as young leaders we should get advice from such academicians.”

The student family further expressed their concern about the alleged rampant tribalism in the institutions of higher learning and urged the conveners of the public lecture to include the vice so that it could be discussed by Prof Thiong’o.

“Ngugi has mingled with people from all walks of life and we think he is in a position to address tribalism in our institutions. We recently saw the University of Eldoret closed because of the same,” Nyanumba added.

Amutabi hailed the University of California at Irvine  professor ahead of his planned historic visit that will be the first of its kind outside Nairobi.

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UGANDA CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY MBALE CAMPUS 1ST INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE PROGRAMME, September 1-3, 2015

UGANDA CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY MBALE CAMPUS 1ST INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE PROGRAM
PRE CONFERENCE DAY Tuesday, September 1st 2015
• Arrival and Registration
• Familiarization and visit to Conference venue
• Checking into hotel rooms
• Distribution of name tags and conference material
• Welcoming Guests on Campus
• Meeting with Session chairs
• Corrections on the Programme
• Make any announcements and changes
• PowerPoint presentations given to ICT staff for presentation

Keynote Speaker
Prof. Maurice Amutabi, PhD DVC Academic Affairs, Kisii University, Kenya
Prof. Mary Sonko Nabachwa, PhD Dean Faculty of Social Sciences, Uganda Christian University
Rev. Dr. Stephen Mungoma, PhD Director, Uganda Christian University Mbale Campus

DAY 1 Wednesday, September 2nd, 2015
8:00am – 10:30am: Conference Opening and Keynote address
MC: Everline Aketch
Time Activity
8:00am- 8:30am Registration
8:30am-8:40am Opening Prayer: Bishop Gidudu Patrick
8:40am – 8:50an Anthems
8:50am – 9:05am Welcoming Remarks and Introduction of Uganda Christian University Management by Director UCU Mbale Campus and Chair, Conference Organizing Committee: Rev. Dr. Stephen Mungoma, PhD
9:05am – 9:20am Remarks by Mr. Bernard Mujjasi
9:20am – 9:25am Opening Speech: Bishop Abura Joseph, Chairman Local Advisory Committee, UCU Mbale Campus
9:25am- 9:40am Opening Remarks: Vice Chancellor Uganda Christian University Rev. Dr. John Senyonyi, PhD
9:40am – 9:45am Entertainment
9:45am- 10:25am Keynote Address: Prof. Maurice Amutabi, PhD DVC Academic Affairs, Kisii University, Kenya
10:25 – 10:30am Vote of thanks: College Secretary, Uganda Christian University, Mrs. Annet Magolo
10:30- 11: 00am Group Photo/Health Break

Parallel Sessions
Panel Session A: 11:00am – 1:00pm
Panel A1: Social, Economic and Political Changes in Africa
Location: Conference Hall 1
Chair: Erisa Kigenyi
1. Watuwa Anthony Khaukha and Watsemwa Teddy (Uganda Christian University Mbale Campus) Institutional factors affecting the performance of district service commissions in Uganda, A case study of Mbale District.
2. Watsemwa Teddy, Watuwa Anthony Khaukha and Wanambwa Ben ( Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Effects of single parenthood on child development in Mbale District, A case study of Bungokho-Mutoto sub-county.
3. Annet Magolo ( Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Analyze the effectiveness of the staff performance appraisal system on employee performance in Mbale district local government
4. Aketch A Everline, Socrates Nambiro and Rose Badaza (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Capacity development programs and employee performance. “A case study of Bugiri Local Government”.

Panel A2: Education and Development in Africa
Location: Conference Hall 2
Chair: Dr. Hannah Gidudu
1. Gimuguni John and Nabaasa Lillian Gimuguni (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) The effects of increased enrolment of students on the quality of education at Makerere University
2. George Malinga (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Quality assurance of instruction using student’s evaluation of courses and teaching (SECAT) – A UCU Mbale case study.
3. Nabaasa Lillian Gimuguni (Uganda Christian University Mbale Campus) Factors that influencing the quality of education in higher institutions of learning in greater Mbale region.
4. Odongo Michael (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Household bleach; An alternative to conventional drawing materials in Uganda’s art institutions

Panel A3: Business and Development in Africa
Location: Conference Hall 3
Chair: Phennihas Kuka
1. Matanda Fred (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Compliance with the PPDA act in selected public institutions in Mbale District.
2. Masuba Martin (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) and Ajambo Catherine (Post Bank) The impact of loan recovery on profitability of SACCOs. A case study of Sironko Town Council
3. Stephen Egwayu and Sam Okware Emokol (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Financial budgets and sustanable growth in uganda: A case of Mbale District local government
4. Arnold Leonard Katongole (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Different types of loans accessed by small scale enterprises (SSES) in Mbale town

Panel A4: Science, Innovation and Technology in Africa
Location: Conference Hall 4
Chair: Dr. Rose Badaza
1. Rose Badaza- Nakileza, (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Factors affecting escape height of four Acacia species
2. By Saminu Falalu, (Islamic University in Uganda) Treatment of textile waste effluents using Moringa oleifera Lam.
3. Ichodu Lucian (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Urban/indoor air pollution and control, Uganda
4. Nafuye Ivan (Uganda Christian University) Local area network in rural urban areas: benefits and challenges
Panel A5:Christianity, Ethics & Development in Africa
Location: Conference Hall 5
Chair: Rev Rugyendo Medard
1. Rev. David Chesakit (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Factors affecting integrity of nurses (health professionals) in Kapchorwa hospital
2. Joseph Odongo, Eric Mwima, John Odutu, Jacqueline Opio and Rev. Omoding- Simon (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus)
3. Nyiro Sarah (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Factors affecting retention of nurses at Africa inland church (AIC) Kijabe hospital, Kenya.
4. Nathan Muwereza (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) PERMEATING CORRUPTION: An Ethical Behavioral Conflict and a Cognitive Dissonance for Development workers
Panel A6 Business and Development in Africa
Location: Conference Hall 6
Chair: Everline Aketch
1. Joseph Odongo, Paul Okiring, Odeke Micheal, Odutu John and Eric Mwima (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Accountability for development in service delivery: A case study Teso region.
2. Dr. Tom Nsubuga (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Internal controls and profitability of floriculture industry: A case of selected flower companies in Wakiso District Uganda
3. Ariokot Florence (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) The role of internal controls in financial performance
4. Abbey Kalenzi (Busoga University) Procurement performance: A challenge and solution to profitability

Lunch: 1:00pm – 2:00pm
Parallel Sessions B 2:00pm – 3:30pm
Panel B1: Business and Development in Africa
Location: Conference Hall 1
Chair: Everline Aketch
1. Wasike Sam Mankind(Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) The role of internal audit in risk management in institutions/ organizations in Uganda
2. Steven Gidudu and Sam Okware Emokol (Uganda Christian University, Mbale campus) Revenue collection for sustainability and development in Uganda: A case of Mbale municipality
3. Chemtai Lucy (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Effect of internal control on profitability of hotels: A case study of Mbale Resorts and Mt. Elgon Hotel in Mbale.
4. Kuka Phennihas (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Customer care and sales performance in commercial institutions. Case study of Mbale municipality

Panel B2:Education and Development in Africa
Location: Conference Hall 2
Chair: Jesca Kusuro
1. Khakale George, Hannah Lunyolo Chelangat Taifa, Nabende Wamakote Danny (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) An assessment of early child hood pedagogy on the communicative skills of infants in Manafwa district
2. Rose Badaza – Nakileza, (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus)Nantale Nasabu (Luuka Disstrict Local Government)and EWK Ndiwalana (Busoga University) The effects of socio-cultural factors on the girl-child academic performance in primary schools: A case study of Bulongo sub county in Luuka District
3. Rose Badaza Nakileza (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) and Musa Birungi (Luuka District) The effects of school facilities on learners’ academic preformance in Bukoma subcounty in Luuka district
4. Nabende Wamakote Danny (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) An analysis of the effects of employee-management relations on employee performance in Mbale Municipal Council Local Government

Panel B 3:Christianity, Ethics & Development in Africa
Location: Conference Hall 3
Chair: Lillian Gimuguni
1. Welishe Simon (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus)UNDERSTANDING TITHING AMONG CHRISTIANS A perspective from an urban setting
2. Joseph Odongo, Eric Mwima, John Odutu , Jacqueline Opio and Rev. Omoding- Simon (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) The role of african regional and sub- regional organizations in peacekeeping initiatives.
3. Jesca Alwenyi and Rose Badaza (Uganda Christian University) Effects of psychological factors on behaviour of children between five and twelve years in Mbale Child Development Centre
4. Obaji Agbiji (University of South Africa, Pretoria, obajiagbiji@gmail.com) Religious leadership and the challenge of sustainable transformational development in post-colonial Africa

Panel B4 Interdisciplinary and Multidisciplinary Research in Africa
Location: Conference Hall 4
Chair: Dr. Tom Nsubuga
1. Ram Miti Kiyingi and Baremiwe Mary Bekoreire (Uganda Christian University) Community participation and performance of government development programmes: Case study of NAADS
2. Jackson Wandeka (Uganda Christian University) Factors hindering re- establishment of coperative societies in Eastern Uganda: Case study of Bududa, Sironko and Manafwa Districts.
3. Asae Leah and Gidudu Hannah Lunyolo, (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) An investigation on causes of poor performance in english language in primary leaving examinations in Mbale municipality
4. Nambale Moses Geoffery, Kyatuha Ovia Mwisaka and Kigenyi Erisa Mazaki (Uganda Christian University) Perceptions on examination policy and malpractice management in Universities in Uganda

Panel B5: Science, Innovation and Technology in Africa
Location: Conference Hall 5
Chair: Dr. Mirumbe
1. Edmond Were and Jeanne Mogusu (Kiisi University) IUU fishing and the challenge on human security around Lake Victoria
2. Dr. Linnet Hamasi, (Kisii University) Women’s knowledge system and food security in northern Kenya: Processes and strategies for sustainable development
3. Mwesigwa Linatte Grace (Kyambogo University) Factors affecting implementation of exclusive breastfeeding among working women in Mbale municipality
4. Kuka Phennihas (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Technological innovation in Uganda’s food processing industry. An emprical investigation of drivers and barriers in Kampala
Panel B6: Social, Economic and Political Changes in Africa
Location: Conference Hall 6
Chair: Ovia Mwisaka
1. Asaasira peninah (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Access to education and socio – economic development in Namatala Ward Industrial Division, Mbale Municipality
2. Mary Baremirwe Bekoreire, Machyo Jane and Mulyanyuma Aaron Ayeta (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Needs assessment and effectiveness of training programmes in local governments: Case study of Eastern Uganda.
3. Aaron Mulyanyuma Ayeta and Rose Badaza Nakileza (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Factors influencing effective interpretation of election information provided by electoral commission in Bugisu sub-region in Uganda.
4. Chelimo Judith and Bekoreire (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus)
Land ownership systems and women’s participation in food security in Kapchorwa District

Health Break: 3:30pm – 3:45pm
Panel Session C 3:45pm – 5:15pm
Panel C1: Interdisciplinary and Multidisciplinary Research in Africa
Location: Conference Hall 1
Chair: Dr. Tom Nsubuga
1. Dr. Tom Nsubuga (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Corporate Governance and financial performance of selected commercial banks in Uganda: A comparative study.
2. Masuba Martin (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Internal AUDIT and financial performance in educational institutions Case study: Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus
3. Machyo Jane (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) The challenges facing the pension reforms in the private sector in Uganda.
4. Chemtai Lucy (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Challenges of internal control in hotel industry : A case study of Mbale hotels
Panel C2: Social, Economic and Political Changes in Africa
Location: Conference Hall 2
Chair: Ovia Mwisaka
1. Manake Diana, Nabaasa Lillian Gimuguni and Rose Badaza (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) The effects of gender roles on women participation in leadership in Buyobo sub-county in Sironko District
2. Sandra Starcy Amollo and Julius Gizamba (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Participation and sustainability of development projects
3. Timothy Akampurira, Alice Mbabazi and Peter Nareeba (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) The contribution of compassion international in addressing the risk factors children referred to compassion assisted projects in Kabale Municipality.
4. Masuba Martin and Ajambo Catherine (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) The role of Bungokho Rural Development Centre (BRDC), in the economic empowerment of women, in Bungokho sub-county

Panel C3: Science, Innovation and Technology in Africa
Location: Conference Hall 3
Chair: Dr. Linnet Hamasi
1. Rose Badaza-Nakileza (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus), Jeremy Midgley(University of Cape Town), Patrick Mucunguzi, Joseph Obua (Makerere University) Germination responses of four acacia species in Lake Mburo National Park, Uganda
2. Linnet Hamasi, PhD (Nairobi Campus, Kisii University) Women, Resource Management and Sustainable Development in Kenya: Special Reference to Pastoralist Communities
3. Nafuye Ivan (Uganda Christian University) Impact of social networking applications specifically Face book, whatsApp on employee’s performance at Uganda Christian University
4. Rose Badaza- Nakileza and Annet Magolo (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Culture and solid waste management in Mbale district

Panel C4: Business and Development in Africa
Location: Conference Hall 4
Chair: Everline Aketch
1. Everline Anyango Aketch (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Internal control system and organization performance in Busoga University
2. Omache O Henry and Mafabi Julius (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Barriers to sustainable procurement in private Universities in Uganda Case study: Uganda Christian University Mbale Campus
3. Dr. Tom Nsubuga (Uganda Christian University Kampala Campus) Borrower behaviour, relationship lending and credit repayment performance in Centenary Rural Development Bank
4. Olemu Charles(Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) The effect of financial management on service delivery in local governments of Uganda: The case of Tororo District Local Government

Panel C5: Education and Development in Africa
Location: Conference Hall 5
Chair: Dr. Hannah Gidudu
1. Nabaasa Lillian Gimuguni (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus)
Class size and the quality of teaching in higher institutions of learning in Mbale municipality.
2. Gimuguni John, Rose Badaza- Nakileza and Nabaasa Lillian Gimuguni (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Effects of school inspection on education service delivery in private primary schools in Bulambuli, Manafa and Soronko districts
3. Walisha Fredah (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Investigation into sexuality education of children with disabilities: Case study orignal Mbale district.
4. Nambale Moses Geoffery, Kyatuha Ovia Mwisaka and Kigenyi Erisa Mazaki (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) perceptions on examination policy and malpractice management in universities in Uganda

Panel C6: Social, Economic and Political Changes in Africa
Location: Conference Hall 6
Chair: Mary Wasike
1. Aaron Mulyanyuma Ayeta (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) The role of voter education in effective electoral process in Eastern Uganda.
2. Mulyanyuma Aaron Ayeta(Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Factors affecting political development in rural areas in Eastern Uganda
3. Nandudu Winfred, Mrs. Lillian Gimuguni, (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Dr Joseph Nsenga (Mbale Hospital) The “MISSED OPPORTUNITIES” in addressing the adolescents sexual reproductive health needs and rights.
4. Baremirwe Mary Bekoreire (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Community groups and access to social protection for informal workers in Uganda.

DAY 2 Wednesday 3rd September 2015
Plenary Session 8:00am-9:00am
Keynote Speaker: Prof. Mary Sonko Nabachwa and Rev. Dr. Stephen Mungoma, PhD

Panel Session D
9:00am– 10:30am
Panel D1:Social, Economic and Political Changes in Africa
Location: Conference Hall 1
Chair: Annet Magolo
1. Shehu Abubakar (Uganda Christian University) Factors affecting socio-economic development in Uganda: A case study of Mbale municipality
2. Aaron Mulyanyuma Ayeta and Rose Badaza Nakileza (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) The influence of ethnic diversity on political development in Uganda
3. Kyatuha Ovia Mwisaka, Nambale Moses Geoffrey and Erisa Kigenyi Mazaki (Uganda Christian University) Local governance and service delivery in Bugisu sub-region in Uganda
4. Jackson Wandeka (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Socio – economic effects of HIV/AIDs among the youth in Wanale Division Mbale District

Panel D2: Education and Development in Africa
Location: Conference Hall 2
Chair: Erisa Kigenyi
1. Nabaasa Lillian Gimuguni (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus)
Factors affecting the growth of Universities in rural and urban areas in Uganda
2. Rose Badaza Nakileza (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Were Isaiah and EWK Ndiwalana. The effects of the quality of teachers on the academic performance of primary seven pupils “A case study of Bugiri Town Council”
3. George Malinga, Education department, (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Educating the University graduate for employment in the ICT revolution
4. Nabaasa Lillian Gimuguni (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) The factors that influence the sizes of catchment areas of secondary schools in Uganda; A case for Kampala District.

Panel D 3: Science, Innovation and Technology in Africa
Location: Conference Hall 5
Chair: Dr. Rose Badaza
1. Kuka Phennihas (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) The impact of information technology in finance audit. Case study of Sironko district
2. Okoth Thomas (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Impact of enterprise systems on organizational resilience
3. Mercy Nafuna and Rose Badaza- Nakileza (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Factors affecting household participation in domestic sold waste management
Panel D 4: Business and Development in Africa
Location: Conference Hall 7
Chair: Phennihas Kuka
1. Arnold Leonard Katongole (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Challenges faced by small scale enterprises (SSES) in accessing loans in Mbale Town
2. Masuba Martin (Uganda Christian University- Mbale Campus) The effect of risk management and organizational performance in private secondary schools in Eastern Uganda; Case study of Mbale municipality
3. Wanambwa Benard, Mafuko David, Nagudi Annet and Watsemwa Teddy (Uganda Christian University). The challenges the rural poor face in accessing and utilizing the services offered microfinance institutions. A case of Pride micro-finance
4. MAFUKO DAVID and WANAMBWA BENARD (Uganda Christian University) The impact of pride micro-finance institution on the Rural Household income in Mbale District Bungokho Sub-county.

Panel D5: Social, Economic and Political Changes in Africa
Location: Conference Hall 1
Chair: Mary Wasike
1. Machyo Jane (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Oorganizational culture and research productivity in private Universities in Uganda
2. Ichodu Lucian (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Effects of HIV/AIDs counseling & testing among women on the economic development of Busia municipal council
3. Aaron Mulyanyuma Ayeta (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) The effectiveness of civic education on political development in decentralized districts in Eastern Uganda.
4. Mary Bekoreire Baremirwe (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Communication and management of cultural diversity in organizations.

Panel D6: Education and Development in Africa
Location: Conference Hall 6
Chair: Jesca Kusuro
1. Jesca kusuro Mary Nabaasa Lillian Gimuguni and Martha C Cheptoyek (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Imprompt transfer of teachers and primary leaving examinations performance in Kapchorwa district
2. Beatrice Kemunto Obwoge and Lynnet B.Ayako Namai Syntactical errors in compositions written by standard seven and eight pupils in Kakamega municipality – Kenya
3. Nabende Wamakote Danny (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Total quality education and academic performance
4. Gidudu Hannah Lunyolo (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Women’s perception on minimal occupation of management positions in government aided secondary schools in Eastern Uganda
Health Break: 11:00am – 11:15am
Panel Session E 11:15am-12:45pm

Panel E1:Social, Economic and Political Changes in Africa
Location: Conference Hall 1
Chair: Ovia Mwisaka
1. Mulyanyuma Aaron Ayeta, Mary Baremirwe Bekoreire and Machyo Jane (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus). Urban planning and urban development in Uganda: A case study of Mbale municipal council
2. David Owino (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) The effects of polygamy on child up bringing in Merikit sub county Tororo district
3. Kigenyi Erisa Mazaki, Nambale Moses Geoffrey and Kyatuha Ovia Mwisaka (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Human resources development and service delivery in local governments: The case of Nakaloke Town Council in Mbale District

Panel E2: Science, Innovation and Technology in Africa
Location: Conference Hall 2
Chair: Dr. Linnet Hamasi
1. John Faith Magolo (Mbarara University of Science and Technology) The role of Risk Knowledge in the management of Climate Change impacts in Mt. Elgon region, Eastern Uganda
2. Rose Badaza- Nakileza and Annet Magolo (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Culture and solid waste management in mbale district
3. Mwesigwa Linatte Grace and Kalumira Francis (Kyambogo University) Exclusive breastfeeding knowledge and practices among working mothers in Mbale district aged 20-40 years

Panel E3: Interdisciplinary and Multidisciplinary Research in Africa
Location: Conference Hall 3
Chair: Dr. Hannah Gidudu
1. Wanambwa Benard, Mafuko David, Nagudi Annet and Watsemwa Teddy (Uganda Christian University). The challenges the rural poor face in accessing and utilizing the services offered microfinance institutions. A case of pride micro-finance
2. Chelangat Moses Taifa, Gidudu Hannah Lunyolo and Khakale George (Uganda Christian University) Effects of late coming on the academic performance in lower primary school
3. Nareeba Peter and Kwarija Annet (Uganda Christian University Mbale Campus) Ccontribution of non govervenmental organizations (NGOs) on poverty reduction: A Case study of World Vision- Muhanga Town Council, Kabale district
4. Fred Machika (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Factors affecting sustainable livelihood among the youth in Lukhonje sub county, Mbale District.

Panel E4: Business and Development in Africa
Location: Conference Hall 4
Chair: Dr. Tom Nsubuga
1. Omutia David (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) Budgeting and budgetary controls in Soroti District Local Government
2. Woniala James: Uganda Christian University- Mbale Impact of Budgeting on Service delivery in Bulambuli District Local Government.
3. Tom Nsubuga (Uganda Christian University, Kanpala Campus) MOBI- Banking and financial performance of commercial banks in uganda: A case study of Kenya Commercial Bank, Uganda Limited
4. Felix Awogbemi- (Islamic University in Uganda) Records management and the procurement of medical supplies at Mbale regional referral hospital

Panel E5: Christianity, Ethics & Development in Africa
Location: Conference Hall 5
Chair: Dr. Lillian Gimuguni
1. Handson Bandari Ogechi, (Kiisi University) Sustainable Conflict Transformation in assessment of the contributions of Development Activities to Peace building in Africa.
2. Kwarija Annet, Nareeba Peter, Akampurira Timothy (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) An assessment of deviance among teenagers in Bubare Subcounty Kabale District.
3. Samari Janet and Chesakit David (REV) (Uganda Christian University, Mbale Campus) The effects of gender imbalance on organizational performance . A case study of Sebei Diocese, Uganda
4. Lambuli Ambrose (Uganda Christian University) Child Labour: An obstacle to the formal education of OVC in Mbale municipality
Panel E6: Social, Economic and Political Changes in Africa
Location: Conference Hall 6
Chair: Erisa Kigenyi.
1. Mary Baremirwe Bekoreire and Machyo Jane (Uganda Christian University) Training and quality improvement in the public sector; A case study of Local Governments in Eastern Uganda
2. WAKWALE PETER SIMON (Livingston International University) The effects of political decentralization on local government performance: with reference to Mbale municipal council.
3. Mawa Fred, Nareeba Peter (Uganda Christian University- Mbale Campus) Decentralization policy and implementation of sanitation programmes; The case of industrial division Mbale Municipality.
4. Danladi Sule (Islamic University in Uganda). Pre-colonial African socio-economic development of the Afo-eloyi polities of North Central Nigeria Tukura

Lunch: 12:15pm – 2:00pm

Conference Closing Ceremony:
MC: Dr. Nathan Muwereza
3:45pm-4:00pm Closing Remarks & Way Forward from the Chair, Conference Organizing Committee: Rev Dr. Stephen Mungoma, PhD
4:00pm-4:15pm Vote of Thanks by Representative of Delegates
4:15pm-4:20pm Vote of Thanks from Academic Registrar Uganda Christian University Mbale Campus. Mrs. Lillian Gimuguni
4:20pm-4:30pm Issuing of Certificates

Delegates depart at leisure

Call for Papers for second International Conference, to be held at Uganda Christian University (UCU), Mbale Campus, Uganda on 1st – 3rd September 2016
General conference theme: GLOBALIZATION IN AFRICA: A CHALLENGE OR OPPORTUNITY?
Conference venue: UGANDA CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY MBALE CAMPUS

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