Need for central database of theses submitted in Kenyan universities

Need for central database of theses submitted in Kenyan universities

 

By Maurice N Amutabi

 

Kenya requires a dissertation and thesis database to be housed in one university or at the Commission for University Education (CUE) urgently to avert future crises in higher education. In the US, the dissertation and theses database is housed at Michigan State University, East Lansing, where all theses and dissertations presented in all universities in the US can be found. There is an urgent need for this because of the thousands of masters’ theses and PhD dissertations that Kenyan universities are producing may be products of massing plagiarism. The lack of central digital repository is worrying stakeholders in the education sector. Many scholars are now calling for a database of all theses and dissertations presented in Kenyan universities to be housed at NACOSTI or CUE or one trustworthy university.

 

The central database will allow supervises to use software such as “turn it in” to detect cheating. Kenya needs all graduate students to submit both electronic or digital copies as well as manual so that they can be subjected to checks against existing database before defences. There have been cases where students are said to change only the title, and key words, so that where the case was Siaya, they put Turkana and pretend that it is a different study. This is cheating and must be stopped otherwise we may have people getting masters degrees without mastery of any content or getting PhDs and contributing nothing new to knowledge.

 

At many American universities, all dissertations and theses are subjected to anti-plagiarism software at the library to make sure that at least 70% of the work is original and no more than 25% has come from outside. Students conduct due diligence to ensure that before submitting any work, it has gone through the necessary checks to be certified as original. I have been to universities where you find similar topics with the difference being the case study area or the place of special reference and researches are beginning to raise eyes brows.

 

Kenyan graduate education is at crossroads because of the manner in which projects, dissertations and theses are processed and examined in various universities, manually. Some of the supervisors do not use any anti plagiarism software and allow theses and dissertations for defence. There is also evidence to suggest that some theses and dissertations are too small to warrant masters or PhD and some fall below the 20,000 words recommended by the Commission for University Education (CUE) for masters theses and 50,000 words recommended for PhD theses by CUE. I have been to some defences in some Kenyan universities where students are not able to defend their work articulately; indicating that some else helped them to write them. There are also cases where supervisors begin to assist students during an active defence which should not be the case. Since defences are oral examinations, students are only supposed to have PowerPoint slides and not notes, but there are cases where they walk in and begin to read from prepared scripts.

 

There are also cases where students are not able to explain how they collected their data leaving examiners wondering how they wrote their theses. There are also reports suggesting that some postgraduate students in Kenyan universities are graduating with masters and doctoral degrees whose research has been presented elsewhere. There are reports that some are only changing the names and submitting them for examination pretending that it is their work. I am an external examiner in three universities in Kenya and three outside Kenya and cannot help to think that some of the theses and dissertations I have been examining need verification to confirm that they have not been presented elsewhere because there is no way of knowing without a central database to which one can use to crosscheck and verify any suspicions.

 

There are also claims that some graduate students in Kenyan universities are hiring cyber cafe attendants to write theses and dissertations for them, resorting to cut and paste without intellectual attribution. I have personally seen masters and PhD theses presented in different fonts such as Arila, Calibri, Courier or Times New Romans which are always one of the clearest indications of cut and paste. There are also cases where you find a thesis with a case study on Embu where you may find references to Kwale, a clear indication of cheating. There are genuine fears that the masters and PhD degree quality may go down as a result of the bad practices that are engulfing our higher education sector that need to be curbed immediately.

 

Prof. Amutabi is the Vice Chancellor of Lukenya University, Kenya and Professor of History – Amutabi@gmail.com

 

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The Average Age of PhD Graduates in Kenyan universities is worrying

The Average Age of PhD Graduates in Kenyan universities is worrying

By Maurice N. Amutabi

Many Kenyans who witnessed recent Kenyan graduations ceremonies must have been surprised by the average age of PhD graduates, because it was evident that many of them have been around for a little longer. The ceremonies were colourful and there is no doubt that the recipients of the permanent head damage (PhD) deserved their degrees, but what was evident was their advanced age, with receding hairlines and colours of grey. Honestly, the age of students graduating with PhDs in Kenyan universities is worrying, because many of them are in their 50s and 60s and something needs to be done about it. This leaves them to work for about 20 years and they reach emeritus status compared to the west where the age of PhD graduates is about 28 and they expect about 50 years service from their PhD holders, and which gives them tremendous amount of advantages.

The past graduation season showed some students using walking sticks to receive their PhDs and some could not kneel at the dais. This got me thinking, and asking myself why our PhD graduates are too old, graduating in their 50s and 60s. One of the reasons is that most of people think about PhDs when they are about to retire and want to increase their working days by seeking to get PhDs, while others started their PhDs many years ago but have been walking the “corridors of recasting” and “corridors of frustration” for a long time that they end up taking over 10 years doing their PhDs. I realised some are victims of a system that does not promote staff development and have worked as lecturers or tutorial fellows for over 20 years since they received their masters and cannot afford high fees charged in PhD programmes. There are those who completed coursework and cannot continue because they cannot afford costs of field research.

I was bothered by the problem of graduating pre-Octogenarians in many Kenyan universities because I also received my PhD late, in my late 30s and was the oldest student in all my PhD courses at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA where majority of my classmates were in their 20s. Many of my professors were in their 30s and 40s and some were much younger than me. The age of Kenyan PhD graduates got me wondering whether late blooming is a Kenyan problem. I applied to begin my PhD in my 20s in 1991 in Kenya and was dismissed as being too young and “in a hurry” which really discouraged me. There were also many obstacles to getting PhD scholarships because the opportunities were given to those who were “known” by the big people on campus and the Ministry of Education at the time. I remember I applied for Commonwealth scholarship to UK and Canada but was always given India, which I was not comfortable with, until the USA government granted me a Fulbright Scholarship to study PhD after waiting for ten years.

Gerontocracy (study of aging) experts will tell you that scholars are most productive between the ages of 30 and 50, and afterwards they begin to decline and move towards their sunset years and start to write memoirs and reflections of their great past. The other issue is that after 50 the human mind begins to slow down and reflex actions begin to experience delays. The mind begins to forget, the body gets frail and easily tired and eyes begin to fail. Unfortunately, many Kenyan professors are above 50 years as well as many PhD holders which cause paralysis in the higher education sector. Students cannot get useful feedback and when they do it is often late. The other problem is that the few professors available end up in administration as directors, deans, deputy vice chancellors and vice chancellors at a relatively young age because salaries for classroom or research professors are depressingly low.

There are also age tensions, between younger and older scholars which affect graduate students.  If you are below 40 and you are a doctor, you realise that in order to survive you have to be seen and not be heard otherwise you will never move beyond lecturer to senior lecturer. Scholars are therefore scared for the dictatorship of age rules. In many university senates, incoherent octogenarians dominate and reminiscence about the past a lot, about their days at Alliance and Maseno under Carey Francis, their days at the University of Nairobi and Kenyatta University “when they were still universities” and ask tough questions during PhD defences which are meant to scare students away, arguing that PhD is for the tough and not for the faint hearted, and it is not for everybody.

Students who have the courage to remain and complete their PhDs are slowed down by problems of supervision with professors and doctors giving comments at their own discretion. If a student questions the speed of receiving feedback, he is labelled ‘trouble maker’ and may never graduate because the professors have formed cartels where they agree on who to graduate and whom to fail. The PhD students are therefore a scared lot and move around with a lot of fear. Some of the professors delay students because of their own differences. They intentionally fail students of their rivals. When they supervise the same student, they cannot agree on many issues, thereby impeded progress of their students. Some male professors make sexual demands on their female PhD students and those who do not cooperate are denounced as ‘weak’ and ‘uncooperative’ and not good team players.

I yearn for a time when Kenyan universities will produce majority of their PhD graduates in their 20s and 30s. It is happening in the West where students who receive first class and upper second are groomed into future professors by being recruited as teaching or graduate assistants with good salaries and given tuition waiver into masters degrees and after two years of masters, they move to PhD degrees and after three years, they can graduate as Doctors. Kenyan professors need to stop looking at the amount of grey hair on the student’s head before granting PhDs. They should promote PhD holders to professorial positions, based on teaching experience, research, supervision of graduate students and publications as yard sticks to advancement, not age, ethnic, gender and other factors.

Prof. Amutabi is the Vice Chancellor of Lukenya University, Kenya and Professor of History – Amutabi@gmail.com

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Call for Papers for the 7th International Interdisciplinary Conference, to be held in Nairobi, Kenya on June 28 to 30, 2017 at Multimedia University of Kenya

 Call for Papers for the 7th International Interdisciplinary Conference, to be held in Nairobi, Kenya on June 28 to 30, 2017 at Multimedia University of Kenya

 General conference theme: “Africa at Development Crossroads”

Conference Venue: Multimedia University of Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya

 Sponsors: African Interdisciplinary Studies Association (AISA), Kenya Scholars and Studies Association (KESSA) and AIDAL

After the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and various strategies under NEPAD and various national development plans, Africa is still at development crossroads. Africa has been at the centre of many and sometimes competing and experimental development paradigms, both from within and outside. African countries are not sure if they need to borrow models from the West or East. Democratic revival has created some hope in some African countries. Despite this hope, many African societies are still gripped in gender, patriarchal and regional tensions. Women, youth, children and minority groups have been marginalized in some countries. Paper presenters will be expected to look from within in order to interrogate the success and some of the challenges these development paradigms have faced in light of external influences. Some governments have created inclusive constitutions that incorporate gender mainstreaming. Researchers are expected to critically examine models and approaches presented for development in health, education, tourism, mining, agriculture, water, livestock development, roads, railway and air transport, development of arid and semi arid lands, science and technology, engineering, environment, urban and rural development, vulnerable groups, minorities, women and children. How sound are development plans developed by African governments? In what ways have they been successful? Whose development and in whose interest?  How should development in Africa proceed? Who should be involved in Africa’s development and why? Are Africa’s development partners genuine? What projects should Africa pursue? These are the type of questions that participants are invited to explore.

Organized and hosted by African Interdisciplinary Studies Association (AISA), this 7th International Interdisciplinary Conference will be held on June 28 to 30, 2017 at Nairobi, Kenya. The conference will bring together scholars from all over the world to make presentations on matters that touch on Africa. Submission of abstracts: Send abstracts of between 250 and 500 words, including full contact details (title, name, address, email-address, and telephone) as well as institutional affiliation by March 30, 2017 to Prof. Maurice N. Amutabi at africanstudiesassociaiton@gmail.com or mauriceamutabi@gmail.com or neddylinnet@gmail.com or Amutabi@yahoo.com or Amutabi@gmail.com

 

The deadline for submission of full papers or PowerPoint presentation is May 30, 2017. Most papers presented at the conference will be selected and published in edited volumes and journals affiliated to African Interdisciplinary Studies Association (AISA). The official language of the conference is English. The conference will consist of ten colloquia organized along themes.

Important dates

Deadline for submission of abstracts – March 30, 2017

Deadline for submission of PowerPoint presentation or full papers May 30, 2017

Conference dates – June 28-30, 2017

 Colloquium 1: Africa and Sectoral Development

Sub Themes:

  1. Pastoralism, Energy, Water, Agriculture and Development in Africa
  2. Politics and Development in Africa
  3. Health, Diseases, Pandemics and Development
  4. Heritage, Culture and Development
  5. Urban and Rural Development
  6. Gender Dynamics and Women in Africa
  7. Democracy and Governance in Africa
  8. Hollywood, Bollywood, Nollywood, Kenywood, hip hop, etc
  9. The language question, minorities and marginalizaiton in Africa
  10. Climate change, Poverty, Deprivation and Vulnerability
  11. Peace, Conflict and Security issues
  12. IDPs and Refugee Crisis in Africa
  13. Economic Development in Africa
  14. Civil Society, NGOs and Social Movements in Africa
  15. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome.

Colloquium 2: Economics and Management of Resources in Africa

Sub-Themes:

  1. Politics of aid, Economic Models, Development Plans and Development in Africa
  2. Minerals, International Trade, Commerce, e-Commerce and e-Baking
  3. Industry and Manufacturing in Africa
  4. Outsourcing and Africa’s ‘Silicon Valleys’ and ‘Industrial Parks’
  5. European Union, Global Finance and Development
  6. Environment, Climate Change and E-waste Management
  7. Planning and Management of Strategic Natural Resources
  8. Business Management, Human Resource and Entrepreneurship
  9. The Cooperative Movement, Women Groups and Savings Societies in Africa
  10. Media, Transport and Communication in Africa
  11. Regional Blocs, Integration and Regional Trade in Africa
  12. Global Business Management
  13. Tourism development in Africa
  14. corruption, inflation, “White elephants” and collapsing banks in Africa
  15. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome.

Colloquium 3: Education and Development in Africa

Sub-Themes:

  1. Primary, Secondary, University Education, Research, Science and Development
  2. Open and Distance Learning, e-learning and e-resources in Africa
  3. Curriculum Reforms and New Pedagogies in Higher Education in Africa
  4. Higher Education, Linkages, Partnerships and Publishing
  5. Regional cooperation, linkages, Exchange Programmes and Collaborations
  6. Evaluation, Education Reforms, Research Repositories and Archives
  7. ICT, teleconferencing, webminars, networking and e-Learning
  8. Gender mainstreaming in Education in Africa
  9. Lifelong Learning and Adult Education in Africa
  10. Industry, Technology and Education
  11. Private Education, Early Childhood Education and Special Education
  12. Technical and Vocational Education in Africa
  13. Education for All, Poverty Prevention and Alleviation and Marginalization
  14. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

Colloquium 4: Judiciary, Constitutionalism and Human Rights

Sub-Themes:

  1. Judicial Reforms and Human Rights in Africa
  2. International Trade and New Maritime Laws
  3. Indigenous, Local, National and Global Legal Systems
  4. Cohesion and Integration Issues
  5. New Constitutional reforms
  6. The role of women and minorities in legal issues
  7. ICT and Law
  8. Gender, Environment and Alternative Legal Systems in Africa
  9. Environmental Law and Conservation
  10. Alternative Dispute Resolution in Africa
  11. Global Legal Education
  12. Land, Environment, Civic and Citizen Education
  13. Special Courts and Small Claims Courts
  14. Global Recruitment Firms in Africa
  15. Illegal and Forced Migration
  16. Treaties, Accords and Agreements
  17. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

Colloquium 5: Engineering, Science and Technology in Africa

Sub-Themes:

  1. Engineering and Training in Science and Technology
  2. Science, Technology and Development
  3. Agriculture, livestock and fisheries
  4. Science and Natural Resource Management
  5. Patents, Trademarks, Technology and Innovation
  6. Industry and University Collaboration
  7. Research and Development (R&D)
  8. Industrial Parks and Innovation Villages
  9. Innovation, Science, Technology and Environment
  10. ICT, Science and Technology
  11. Science, Technology and Gender
  12. Science, Children and Youth
  13. Health, Medicine HIV and AIDS
  14. Health Tourism and Foreign Aid
  15. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

 Colloquium 6: Religion, NGOs and non-State Agencies in Development in Africa

Sub-Themes:

  1. Radicalization, Islam and Christianity in Africa
  2. Radical Religious Groups in Africa
  3. Media and the Church in Africa
  4. Ethics and Development in Africa
  5. Theology and Development in Africa
  6. Faith-Based NGOs
  7. Religious Institutions and Development
  8. Al Qaeda, Boko Haram, Al Shabaab and global peace and security
  9. Global Mega Evangelists
  10. Religion and Environmental Issues
  11. Religion, Gender and Women in Africa
  12. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

 Colloquium 7: Security, Peace and Conflict in Africa

Sub-Themes:

  1. Africa Security Architecture
  2. Al Qaeda, Boko Haram, Al Shabaab and global peace and security
  3. Conflict, Rebel activities, War and Violence in Africa
  4. The UN, African Union, Gender and Human Rights
  5. Peace and Security in the Great Lakes Region
  6. Conflict Management
  7. War and Refugees in Africa
  8. Ethical Issues in Development
  9. Democracy, Leadership and Governance in Africa
  10. Dictatorship, term limits and Corruption in Africa
  11. Regional Bodies and peace in Africa
  12. Displacement, Refugees and International Affairs
  13. Failed and near-failed states in Africa
  14. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

Colloquium 8: Library, Information and Communication Technology

Sub-Themes:

  1. a) Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in Africa
  2. b) The nature and state of ICT in Africa
  3. c) Mobile Libraries, Dissemination and publishing
  4. d) Library resources in Africa
  5. e) E-Library/Virtual library
  6. f) E- books/E-Journals
  7. g) Internet Research and online publishing
  8. h) Communication and Journalism
  9. i) Language, Radio and TV stations in Africa
  10. Gender and ICT in Africa
  11. ICT and environment in Africa
  12. Business innovations in ICT – m-pesa, m-kopa, etc
  13. Oral literature and oral narratives and texts
  14. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

Colloquium 9: Interdisciplinary and Multidisciplinary Research in Africa

Sub-Themes:

  1. Challenges of invention of states and ethnic groups in Africa
  2. Indigenous Knowledge Systems and Development in Africa
  3. Gender, Women and Development in Africa
  4. Corporate Social Responsibility
  5. Aid and Sectoral Development
  6. New Paradigms of Development
  7. Minority Groups and Tensions
  8. Interdisciplinary Research and Development
  9. Public Policy and Ecology
  10. Entrepreneurship and Development
  11. Minorities and Development
  12. Integrated Rural Urban Development
  13. Funding Interdisciplinary Research and Development
  14. Social, Economic and Political Research
  15. Research Regimes
  16. Opinion polls, surveys and mapping in Africa
  17. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

 Colloquium 10: Roundtables, independent panels and association meetings

Sub-Themes:

  1. Open for any panels or roundtables or association meetings
  2. Any relevant topic

Registration Fees:

  1. Staff from East African Universities and Organizations US$ 60 (KES 6,000)
  2. Rest of Africa US$ 150
  3. Rest of the World – Europe, North America, Asia, etc US$ 200
  4. Exhibition and advertising stand – US$ 200

Registration fee payments to: African Interdisciplinary Studies Association (AISA), Nairobi, Kenya

ALL GENERAL ENQUIRIES TO BE ADDRESSED TO:

Prof. Maurice N. Amutabi, Convenor and Chair

African Interdisciplinary Studies Association (AISA), Nairobi, Kenya

P.O. Box 13447-00400,

Nairobi, Kenya

E-mail: africanstudiesassociaiton@gmail.com or mauriceamutabi@gmail.com or neddylinnet@gmail.com or Amutabi@yahoo.com or Amutabi@gmail.com

 

 

 

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Pictures from the Second International Conference at CUEA, 2013

CUEA International Conference Group Picture

CUEA International Conference Group Picture

CUEA International Conference Group Picture

CUEA International Conference Group Picture

Group Picture behind the CUEA Clock

Group Picture behind the CUEA Clock

Group Picture at CUEA Annual International Interdisciplinary Conference June 26-30, 2012

Group Picture at CUEA Annual International Interdisciplinary Conference June 26-30, 2012

Group Picture at CUEA 1st Annual International Interdisciplinary Conference June 26-30, 2012

Group Picture at CUEA 1st Annual International Interdisciplinary Conference June 26-30, 2012

Group Picture at CUEA 1st Annual International Interdisciplinary Conference held on June 26-30, 2012

Group Picture at CUEA 1st Annual International Interdisciplinary Conference held on June 26-30, 2012

Kenya cuisine, lunch time at the international conference

Kenya cuisine, lunch time at the international conference

Kenya cuisine, lunch time at the international conference

Kenya cuisine, lunch time at the international conference

Lunch at the First Annual Interdisciplinary conference

Lunch at the First Annual Interdisciplinary conference

Lunch at the conference

Lunch at the conference

Eric and Dr Ngumbi

Eric and Dr Ngumbi

Enjoying lunch

Enjoying lunch

Dr Shimiyu and Linnet Hamasi at the conference

Dr Shimiyu and Linnet Hamasi at the conference

Dr Jacinta Ndambuki enjoying a meal

Dr Jacinta Ndambuki enjoying a meal

Delegates having Lunch at the conference

Delegates having Lunch at the conference

Delegates from Nigeria at the conference

Delegates from Nigeria at the conference

Delegates at 1st Annual International Interdisciplinary Conference

Delegates at 1st Annual International Interdisciplinary Conference

Brother Peter Takahikire at the conference

Brother Peter Takahikire at the conference

Bibian Okoli, Mark Antony and friends having lunch

Bibian Okoli, Mark Antony and friends having lunch

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Degree and diploma programmes at Lukenya University, Kenya

We welcome you to apply to join Lukenya University, which is duly accredited by the Government of Kenya through the Commission for University Education (CUE) as a private university in Kenya, located in Kibwezi in Makueni County. The University received its Letter of Interim Authority from the Commission for Higher Education (CHE), on November 16th, 2015. The University offers the following programmes: tter of Interim Authority is the first accreditation step for private Universities in Kenya.

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Programme Minimum qualifications Mode of Study Duration Tuition Fee
Bachelor of Commerce (B.Com)

–          Finance

–          Accounting

–          Strategic Management

–          Human Resource Management

–          Entrepreneurship & Small Business

–          Purchasing & Supplies Management

Mean Grade of C+ (plus) in KCSE with a C (plain) in Mathematics & English/Kiswahili OR Diploma in related field from a recognized institution Full Time/ Part time 4 years Ksh. 43,500.00 Per  Trimester
Diploma programmes

Diploma in Human Resource Management, Diploma in Business Management, Diploma in supply chain Management, Diploma in social work and community development, Diploma in Agriculture, Diploma in building and construction, Diploma in food and beverage, Diploma in Sales and Marketing, Diploma in Marketing Management, Diploma in Co-operative Management, Diploma in Hotel & Hospitality Management, Diploma in Ecotourism & Hospitality Management, Diploma in Project Management, Diploma in County Leadership Management, Diploma in Procurement & Logistics Management,

Mean  Grade C- OR  Certificate in a related area  with  a credit pass from a recognized institution Full Time/ Part time 2  Years  
Certificate courses

Certificate in Sales & Marketing, Certificate in Human Resource Management, Certificate in Stores and Supplies, Certificate in Project Management, Certificate in Project Management, Certificate in Business Administration, Certificate in Marketing Management, Certificate in Co-operative Management , Certificate in Eco-tourism & Hospitality Management, Certificate in Hotel & Hospitality Management, Certificate in Accounting & Finance, Certificate in Secretarial Management & Administration, Certificate in Risk Management, Certificate in Credit Management, Certificate in Financial Analysis

KCSE Mean Grade  of  D+ (plus ) or its equivalent OR Certificate holders  in related areas from recognized institutions Full Time/ Part time 3 months  
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
Bachelor of Education -Arts (Options: English& Literature, History & Religious Studies, Geography& Kiswahili, Maths & Business, etc) Mean Grade of C+ (plus) in KCSE and above (Or equivalent) with a C+ (plus) in subjects of specialization. OR Two Principals & two Subsidiary Pass in KACE   OR S1 or diploma in the relevant area, with two years teaching experience Full Time/ Part time/

school based

4 years Ksh. 43,500.00 Per  Trimester
Post Graduate

Diploma in Education (P.G.D.E)

First Degree from a recognized university with two teaching subjects Full time  & School based 1 year Kshs. 35,000 per trimester
Diploma in Teacher Education, Diploma in ECDE

 

KCSE with a minimum of D+ and a P1 certificate with a teaching experience of at least two years   OR  KCSE mean grade of  C with a P1 certificate Full time and school based   Kshs. 20,500 per trimester
SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Diploma in Criminology & Security studies, Diploma in Public Administration & Political Science, Diploma in Community Development, Diploma in County Management, Diploma in Project Planning, Diploma in County Leadership and Management, Diploma in Community and Social Development, Diploma in Social Work, Diploma in Public Relations, Diploma in Project Planning & Development. Mean  Grade C- OR  Certificate in a related area  with  a credit pass from a recognized institution Full time and part time    
Certificate in Public Relations, Certificate in Social Work, Certificate in Community & Social Development ,Certificate in East African Community Affairs, Certificate in Disaster Management,  Certificate in Public Administration and Evaluation, Certificate in Electoral Law, Administration and Management, Certificate in County Management and Governance, Certificate in Criminology & Security Studies KCSE Mean Grade  of D+ (plus ) or its equivalent OR  Certificate holders  in related areas from recognized institutions Full time 4 months Kshs. 20,500 per trimester

 

Proposed programmes (forthcoming)
1. Bachelors of Arts (BA) in Criminology and Security Studies

Bachelor of Arts in Peace and Security Studies

Mean Grade of C+ (plus) in KCSE or diploma from a recognized institution Fulltime/Part-time /School Based 4 years Kshs. 43,500 per trimester
2. MA – History, Criminology and Security Studies, Geography, Religious Studies, Literature, Linguistics, Kiswahili, Project Planning & Management, County Governance and Management, Political Science, Diplomacy and International Relations, Development Studies, Peace and Conflict, Sociology, Public Administration and Public Policy Bachelor of Arts in related field with 2nd class   upper division OR 2nd class lower division with 2years working experience Fulltime/Part-time /School Based

 

2 years Ksh. 55,000

Per trimester

3. MBA – Finance, Accounting, Strategic Management, Human Resource Management, Entrepreneurship, Global Economics Bachelor of Arts in related field with 2nd class   upper division OR 2nd class lower division with 2years working experience Fulltime/Part-time /School Based 2 years Kshs. 55,00 per trimester

 

 

Application forms are obtained from the Admissions Office free or charge. There is no application fee for all the programmes at Lukenya University.  Application forms are obtained through our website http://www.lukenyauniversity.ac.ke/index.php  which will be filled and sent together with copies of relevant certificates to: The Registrar – Academic and Students Affairs, The Lukenya University, P.O Box: 619 – 00204 Athi River, Kenya

Apply now and attach copies of relevant certificates, passport size photograph.

 

Payment Mode: Electronic money transfer, money order or bankers’ cheques payable to Lukenya University.

 

Co -operative bank, Athiriver Branch, A/C number 01120065233804 payable at any Co-operative Bank Branch

OR Kenya commercial Bank, Machakos Branch, Acc. No. 1154128822 A/C Name: Lukenya College

 

For further information call           

Tel: 0790-444000 / 0791-444000

E-mail: info@lukenyauniversity.ac.ke

 

Prof. Maurice N. Amutabi, Vice Chancellor, The Lukenya University

 

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Bachelors degree programs at Lukenya University

Lukenya University has two degree programs:

School of Business

Bachelor of Commerce (B. Com)

    • Accounting
    • Finance
    • Marketing
    • Strategic Management
    • Purchasing and Supplies
    • Entrepreneurship
    • Global FinanceBachelor of Education (Arts)

      Students must receive KCSE MEAN C+ Plus a C+ in two teaching Subjects.

  • B.Ed Covers most teaching subjects in secondary schools in Kenya such as
    • History
    • Kiswahili
    • Religious Studies
    • Geography
    • Mathematics
    • English
    • Literature

Proposed Bachelors programs at Lukenya for 2017/2018

  • Bachelor of Arts in Criminology
  • Bachelor of Arts in Development Studies
  • Bachelor of Arts in Peace and Security Studies
  • Bachelor of Arts in International Relations
  • Bachelor of Science in Computer and Information Systems

Proposed Masters Programs at Lukenya University in 2018/19

  • MA Political Science
  • MA International Relations
  • MA Development Studies
  • MA History
  • MA Kiswahili
  • MA Religious Studies
  • MA Geography
  • MA Mathematics
  • MA English
  • MA Literature
  • M.Ed (Administration, Educational Planning, Curriculum and Instruction, Economics of Education, Communication Technology and Research and Evaluation)
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Call for Papers for the 7th International Interdisciplinary Conference, to be held in Nairobi, Kenya on June 27 to 30, 2017 at Multimedia University of Kenya

Call for Papers for the 7th International Interdisciplinary Conference, to be held in Nairobi, Kenya on June 27 to 30, 2017 at Multimedia University of Kenya

 

General conference theme: “Africa at Development Crossroads”

Conference Venue: Multimedia University of Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya

 

Sponsors: African Interdisciplinary Studies Association (AISA), Kenya Scholars and Studies Association (KESSA) and AIDAL

After the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and various strategies under NEPAD and various national development plans, Africa is still at development crossroads. Africa has been at the centre of many and sometimes competing and experimental development paradigms, both from within and outside. African countries are not sure if they need to borrow models from the West or East. Democratic revival has created some hope in some African countries. Despite this hope, many African societies are still gripped in gender, patriarchal and regional tensions. Women, youth, children and minority groups have been marginalized in some countries. Paper presenters will be expected to look from within in order to interrogate the success and some of the challenges these development paradigms have faced in light of external influences. Some governments have created inclusive constitutions that incorporate gender mainstreaming. Researchers are expected to critically examine models and approaches presented for development in health, education, tourism, mining, agriculture, water, livestock development, roads, railway and air transport, development of arid and semi arid lands, science and technology, engineering, environment, urban and rural development, vulnerable groups, minorities, women and children. How sound are development plans developed by African governments? In what ways have they been successful? Whose development and in whose interest?  How should development in Africa proceed? Who should be involved in Africa’s development and why? Are Africa’s development partners genuine? What projects should Africa pursue? These are the type of questions that participants are invited to explore.

 

Organized and hosted by African Interdisciplinary Studies Association (AISA), this 7th International Interdisciplinary Conference will be held on June 28 to 30, 2017 at Nairobi, Kenya. The conference will bring together scholars from all over the world to make presentations on matters that touch on Africa. Submission of abstracts: Send abstracts of between 250 and 500 words, including full contact details (title, name, address, email-address, and telephone) as well as institutional affiliation by March 30, 2017 to Prof. Maurice N. Amutabi at africanstudiesassociaiton@gmail.com or mauriceamutabi@gmail.com or neddylinnet@gmail.com or Amutabi@yahoo.com or Amutabi@gmail.com

 

The deadline for submission of full papers or PowerPoint presentation is May 30, 2017. Most papers presented at the conference will be selected and published in edited volumes and journals affiliated to African Interdisciplinary Studies Association (AISA). The official language of the conference is English. The conference will consist of ten colloquia organized along themes.

 

Important dates

Deadline for submission of abstracts – March 30, 2017

Deadline for submission of PowerPoint presentation or full papers May 30, 2017

Conference dates – June 28-30, 2017

 

Colloquium 1: Africa and Sectoral Development

Sub Themes:

  1. Pastoralism, Energy, Water, Agriculture and Development in Africa
  2. Politics and Development in Africa
  3. Health, Diseases, Pandemics and Development
  4. Heritage, Culture and Development
  5. Urban and Rural Development
  6. Gender Dynamics and Women in Africa
  7. Democracy and Governance in Africa
  8. Hollywood, Bollywood, Nollywood, Kenywood, hip hop, etc
  9. The language question, minorities and marginalizaiton in Africa
  10. Climate change, Poverty, Deprivation and Vulnerability
  11. Peace, Conflict and Security issues
  12. IDPs and Refugee Crisis in Africa
  13. Economic Development in Africa
  14. Civil Society, NGOs and Social Movements in Africa
  15. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome.

 

Colloquium 2: Economics and Management of Resources in Africa

Sub-Themes:

  1. Politics of aid, Economic Models, Development Plans and Development in Africa
  2. Minerals, International Trade, Commerce, e-Commerce and e-Baking
  3. Industry and Manufacturing in Africa
  4. Outsourcing and Africa’s ‘Silicon Valleys’ and ‘Industrial Parks’
  5. European Union, Global Finance and Development
  6. Environment, Climate Change and E-waste Management
  7. Planning and Management of Strategic Natural Resources
  8. Business Management, Human Resource and Entrepreneurship
  9. The Cooperative Movement, Women Groups and Savings Societies in Africa
  10. Media, Transport and Communication in Africa
  11. Regional Blocs, Integration and Regional Trade in Africa
  12. Global Business Management
  13. Tourism development in Africa
  14. corruption, inflation, “White elephants” and collapsing banks in Africa
  15. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome.

 

 

Colloquium 3: Education and Development in Africa

Sub-Themes:

  1. Primary, Secondary, University Education, Research, Science and Development
  2. Open and Distance Learning, e-learning and e-resources in Africa
  3. Curriculum Reforms and New Pedagogies in Higher Education in Africa
  4. Higher Education, Linkages, Partnerships and Publishing
  5. Regional cooperation, linkages, Exchange Programmes and Collaborations
  6. Evaluation, Education Reforms, Research Repositories and Archives
  7. ICT, teleconferencing, webminars, networking and e-Learning
  8. Gender mainstreaming in Education in Africa
  9. Lifelong Learning and Adult Education in Africa
  10. Industry, Technology and Education
  11. Private Education, Early Childhood Education and Special Education
  12. Technical and Vocational Education in Africa
  13. Education for All, Poverty Prevention and Alleviation and Marginalization
  14. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

 

Colloquium 4: Judiciary, Constitutionalism and Human Rights

Sub-Themes:

  1. Judicial Reforms and Human Rights in Africa
  2. International Trade and New Maritime Laws
  3. Indigenous, Local, National and Global Legal Systems
  4. Cohesion and Integration Issues
  5. New Constitutional reforms
  6. The role of women and minorities in legal issues
  7. ICT and Law
  8. Gender, Environment and Alternative Legal Systems in Africa
  9. Environmental Law and Conservation
  10. Alternative Dispute Resolution in Africa
  11. Global Legal Education
  12. Land, Environment, Civic and Citizen Education
  13. Special Courts and Small Claims Courts
  14. Global Recruitment Firms in Africa
  15. Illegal and Forced Migration
  16. Treaties, Accords and Agreements
  17. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

 

Colloquium 5: Engineering, Science and Technology in Africa

Sub-Themes:

  1. Engineering and Training in Science and Technology
  2. Science, Technology and Development
  3. Agriculture, livestock and fisheries
  4. Science and Natural Resource Management
  5. Patents, Trademarks, Technology and Innovation
  6. Industry and University Collaboration
  7. Research and Development (R&D)
  8. Industrial Parks and Innovation Villages
  9. Innovation, Science, Technology and Environment
  10. ICT, Science and Technology
  11. Science, Technology and Gender
  12. Science, Children and Youth
  13. Health, Medicine HIV and AIDS
  14. Health Tourism and Foreign Aid
  15. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

 

Colloquium 6: Religion, NGOs and non-State Agencies in Development in Africa

Sub-Themes:

  1. Radicalization, Islam and Christianity in Africa
  2. Radical Religious Groups in Africa
  3. Media and the Church in Africa
  4. Ethics and Development in Africa
  5. Theology and Development in Africa
  6. Faith-Based NGOs
  7. Religious Institutions and Development
  8. Al Qaeda, Boko Haram, Al Shabaab and global peace and security
  9. Global Mega Evangelists
  10. Religion and Environmental Issues
  11. Religion, Gender and Women in Africa
  12. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

 

Colloquium 7: Security, Peace and Conflict in Africa

Sub-Themes:

  1. Africa Security Architecture
  2. Al Qaeda, Boko Haram, Al Shabaab and global peace and security
  3. Conflict, Rebel activities, War and Violence in Africa
  4. The UN, African Union, Gender and Human Rights
  5. Peace and Security in the Great Lakes Region
  6. Conflict Management
  7. War and Refugees in Africa
  8. Ethical Issues in Development
  9. Democracy, Leadership and Governance in Africa
  10. Dictatorship, term limits and Corruption in Africa
  11. Regional Bodies and peace in Africa
  12. Displacement, Refugees and International Affairs
  13. Failed and near-failed states in Africa
  14. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

 

Colloquium 8: Library, Information and Communication Technology

Sub-Themes:

  1. a) Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in Africa
  2. b) The nature and state of ICT in Africa
  3. c) Mobile Libraries, Dissemination and publishing
  4. d) Library resources in Africa
  5. e) E-Library/Virtual library
  6. f) E- books/E-Journals
  7. g) Internet Research and online publishing
  8. h) Communication and Journalism
  9. i) Language, Radio and TV stations in Africa
  10. Gender and ICT in Africa
  11. ICT and environment in Africa
  12. Business innovations in ICT – m-pesa, m-kopa, etc
  13. Oral literature and oral narratives and texts
  14. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

 

Colloquium 9: Interdisciplinary and Multidisciplinary Research in Africa

Sub-Themes:

  1. Challenges of invention of states and ethnic groups in Africa
  2. Indigenous Knowledge Systems and Development in Africa
  3. Gender, Women and Development in Africa
  4. Corporate Social Responsibility
  5. Aid and Sectoral Development
  6. New Paradigms of Development
  7. Minority Groups and Tensions
  8. Interdisciplinary Research and Development
  9. Public Policy and Ecology
  10. Entrepreneurship and Development
  11. Minorities and Development
  12. Integrated Rural Urban Development
  13. Funding Interdisciplinary Research and Development
  14. Social, Economic and Political Research
  15. Research Regimes
  16. Opinion polls, surveys and mapping in Africa
  17. Abstracts on any other relevant topic are welcome

 

Colloquium 10: Roundtables, independent panels and association meetings

Sub-Themes:

  1. Open for any panels or roundtables or association meetings
  2. Any relevant topic

 

Registration Fees:

  1. Staff from East African Universities and Organizations US$ 60 (KES 6,000)
  2. Rest of Africa US$ 150
  3. Rest of the World – Europe, North America, Asia, etc US$ 200
  4. Exhibition and advertising stand – US$ 200

 

Registration fee payments to: African Interdisciplinary Studies Association (AISA), Nairobi, Kenya

ALL GENERAL ENQUIRIES TO BE ADDRESSED TO:

Prof. Maurice N. Amutabi, Convenor and Chair

African Interdisciplinary Studies Association (AISA), Nairobi, Kenya

P.O. Box 13447-00400,

Nairobi, Kenya

E-mail: africanstudiesassociaiton@gmail.com or mauriceamutabi@gmail.com or neddylinnet@gmail.com or Amutabi@yahoo.com or Amutabi@gmail.com

 

 

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