Postograduate Programmes at Kisii University

KISII UNIVERSITY
S/No Course Title/Area of Specialization Requirements Duration/
Mode of Study
FACULTY OF ARTS AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
PhD Development Studies
PhD Gender and Development
PhD Political Science
PhD Leadership and Governance
PhD Disaster Management Holders of Masters degree in relevant field or its equivalent from a recognized Institution/University. Part-time classes
(evening)

1. 6. MA – History, MA-Geography, MA-Religion Studies, MA-Literature, MA-Linguistics, MA-Kiswahili BA in respective area or BED in subject area with a second class upper or lower with 3 years experience Part-time classes
(evening)/SchoolBased
2. MA Philosophy BA in Philosophy, any social science course with Philosophy as a major second upper or lower with three years in related area. Part-time classes
(evening)/SchoolBased
3. MA-Peace and Conflict Management BA in any Social Science, Philosophy, Theology, Peace and Conflict, second class upper or lower with 3years experience in related areas. Part-time classes
(evening)
4. MA – Sociology BA in Sociology, or any social science course with sociology as a major second class upper, or lower with 3 years experience in related field. Part-time classes
5. MA – Public Administration BA in Public Administration or BA in Political Science or Social Science related courses second class upper or lower with 3 years experience in related field. (evening)
6. MA- Project Planning & Management Bachelor degree with second class upper or lower or PGDE Part-time classes
7. MA-Political Science BA in Political Science, or in any Social Science with a minor in Political Science with B in average score. (evening)
8. MA-International Relations Degree in Political Science, Public Administration or any Social Science Course with a minor in Political Science) second class upper or lower with 3 years experience in related fields. Part-time classes
FACULTY OF EDUCATION
1. PhD Education Management
(Administration, Planning and Economics)
Holders of Masters degree in relevant field or its equivalent from a recognized Institution/University Part-time classes
(evening)
2. PhD Education Foundations
(Sociology, Philosophy, Comparative Education, History of Education)
1. Master of Curriculum and Instruction Bachelors degree with at least Upper Second Class Honours or equivalent from a recognized University or Bachelors degree with Lower Second Class Honours plus at least three years relevant experience or Bachelors degree with pass plus at least five years relevant working experience. Part-time classes
(evening)
2. Master of Guidance and Counselling
3. Master of Education Management
4. Master of Education Foundations
5. Master of Curriculum and Instruction
6. Master of Guidance and Counselling
FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT
S/No Course Title/Area of Specialization Qualification Duration/
Mode of Study
1. PhD Environmental Science Holders of Masters degree in relevant field or its equivalent from a recognized Institution/University. Part-time classes
(evening)
2. PhD Natural Resources
3. PhD Agricultural Education
4. PhD Agricultural Extension
5. PhD Agricultural Economics
(Bsc. AGEC)
6. PhD Agribusiness Management
7. PhD Animal Science
8. PhD Agronomy

1. Master of Environmental Science Bachelors degree with at least Upper Second Class Honours or equivalent from a recognized University or Bachelors degree with Lower Second Class Honours plus at least three years relevant experience or Bachelors degree with pass plus at least five years relevant working Part-time classes
(evening)
2. Master of Natural Resources
3. Master of Agricultural Education
4. Master of Agricultural Extension
5. Master of Agricultural Economics
(Bsc. AGEC)
6. Master of Agribusiness Management
7. Master of Livestock Production Systems (MSc. LIPS)
8. Master of Animal Health Management
9. Master of Agronomy

FACULTY OF INFORMATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
S/No Course Title/Area of Specialization Qualification Duration/
Mode of Study
1. Master of Information Science Second Class Honours (Upper Division)
Bachelors degree in Information Science or related disciplines from a recognized University or Second Class Honours (Lower Division) Bachelors degree in Information Science or related disciplines with 2 years’ experience in relevant profession. Part-time classes
(evening)
2. Master of Information Systems Second Class Honours (Upper Division)
Bachelors degree in Information Science, Information Systems, Computer Science or related disciplines from a related disciplines from a recognized University or Second Class Honours (Lower Division) Bachelors degree in Information Science, Information Syestems, Computer Science or related disciplines with 2 years’ experience in relevant profession. Part-time classes
(evening)
3. Master of Knowledge Management Second Class Honours (Upper Division)
Bachelors degree in any discipline from a recognized University or Second Class Honours (Lower Division) Bachelors degree with 2 years’ experience in relevant profession. Part-time classes
(evening)
4. Master of Journalism and Mass Communication Second Class Honours (Upper Division)
Bachelors degree in Journalism and Communication related disciplines from a recognized University or Second Class Honours (Lower Division) in Journalism and related disciplines with 2 years’ experience in relevant profession or Bachelors degree in any discipline with postgraduate qualification in Journalism, Mass Media, Communication and related disciplines. Part-time classes
(evening)
FACULTY OF COMMERCE
S/No Course Title/Area of Specialization Qualification Duration/
Mode of Study
1. Doctor of Philosophy in Business Management (PHD) Must be a holder of Masters Degree from Kisii University or any other University recognized by Kisii senate in areas of Business and Economics or related disciplines. Part-time classes
(evening)
2. PhD Business Administration Part-time classes
(evening)
3. Master of Human Resource Management (MHRM) (a) Second Class Honours (Upper Division ) and above OR
(b) Second Class Honours ( Lower Division) with at least two years experience Part-time classes
(evening)
4. Master of Business Administration (MBA) (a) Second Class Honours (Upper Division ) and above OR
(b) Second Class Honours ( Lower Division) with at least two years experience Part-time classes
(evening)
5. Master of Entrepreneurship(ENTR) (a) Second Class Honours (Upper Division ) and above OR
(b) Second Class Honours ( Lower Division) with at least two years experience Part-time classes
(evening)
6. Master of Tourism Management
( TOUR) (a) Second Class Honours (Upper Division ) and above OR
(b) Second Class Honours ( Lower Division) with at least two years experience Part-time classes
(evening)

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Bachelors degree programmes at Kisii University

KISII UNIVERSITY

Kisii Uni Jan2014IntakeF

Course Information Brochure

ACADEMIC PROGRAMMES

OUR MISSION
To train high level human resource that meets the development needs of the country and international labour market, sustain production of quality research and consultancy; disseminate knowledge, skills and competencies for the advancement of Humanity

OUR VISION
A World class University in the advancement of academic
excellence, research and social Welfare

INTAKES:
FULLTIME/ PARTIME: JANUARY, MAY & SEPTEMBER
SCHOOLBASED: APRIL, AUGUST & DECEMBER

CAMPUSES: MAIN CAMPUS
KEROKA CAMPUS (AT OTANGE PLAZA)
NYAMIRA CAMPUS (CHIEF SAM PLAZA)
OGEMBO CAMPUS (COUNTY HALL)
ISEBANIA CAMPUS (THE MARK BUILDING)
KEHANCHA CAMPUS (MALI COMPLEX)
ELDORET CAMPUS (AT TARITA CENTRE)
KISUMU CBD CAMPUS (GEORGE ORARO PLAZA)
NAIROBI CBD CAMPUS (CORNER HOUSE)
APPLICATION PROCEDURE:
Application forms are obtained from the Admissions Office upon payment of a non-refundable application fee of Kshs. 2,000.00 for Degree & Enhancement programmes, Kshs. 1,000.00 for Diploma, Kshs. 500.00 for certificate and Kshs. 1,000.00 for all bridging programmes. The forms are also obtained through our website http://www.kisiiuniversity.ac.ke which will be filled and sent together with an original bank pay-in-slip application fees in favour of Kisii University at any branch of the following Banks: National Bank of Kenya, a/c number: 01230035009000 , Co-operative Bank of Kenya a/c number: 01129297079400 and KCB a/c number:1135404291
The duly completed forms should be returned to: the Registrar Academic & Student Affairs, Kisii University P.O. Box 408-40200 Kisii. Apply now and attach copies of relevant certificates, passports size photograph and the original application fee receipt.
Kisii University
P.O. Box 408 Kisii
Phone: 0720-127094 / 0727238343/0724554469/ 0720 094 039/0723469724/020-2610479
E-mail: info@kisiiuniversity.ac.ke admissions@kisiiuniversity.ac.ke, acregistrar@kisiiuniversity.ac.ke
FACULTY OF EDUCATION AND HUMAN RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT
Ph. D in Curriculum and Instruction
Ph. D in Guidance and Counselling
Ph. D in Education Management (Administration, Planning and Economics)
Ph. D in Education Foundations (Sociology, Philosophy, Comparative Education, History of Education)
Requirements: Holders of Masters degree in relevant field or its equivalent from a recognized Institution/University
Duration and mode: 3 yrs 150,000/= per year Part Time
Masters of Education ( Guidance & Counselling)
Masters of Education (Curriculm & Instruction)
Masters of Education ( Education Management – Administration, Planning and Economics)
Masters of Education (Education Foundations – Sociology, Philosophy, Comparative Education, History of Education)
Requirements: B.ED degree with at least upper second-class honours in relevant field OR B.Sc/B.A degree plus post graduate diploma in education or its equivalent.
Duration and mode: 2 yrs 117,000/= per year School based
Post Graduate Diploma in Education
Requirements: First Degree from a recognized university with two teaching subjects
Duration and mode: 1 yr . 80,000/= per year School based
Bachelor of Education (Science) (Options: Mathematics & Phyc, Math & Chem, Bio & Chem, Math & Geog e.t.c)
Bachelor of Education (Arts) (Options: Eng, Litt, Hist, Religious Studies, Geog, Swahili, Business Studies e.t.c)
Requirements Mean grade C+ and above with a C+ in subjects of Specialization OR 2 Principals & Subsidiary pass in KACE OR S1 Diploma in the relevant area.
Duration and mode 4 yrs 110,000/= per year
Bachelor of Education (Primary Option) (Options: Science & Agric, Languages, Mathematics, Social Studies)
Requirements: Mean grade C with P1 certificate , atleast a C in areas of specialization and C in either English or Kiswahili OR Diploma in Education holders
Duration and mode: 4 yrs Ksh.110,000/= per year School Based
Bachelor of Education (Early Childhood Development)
Requirements: Mean grade C+ (plus) in K.C.S.E, atleast C (plain) in English/Kiswahili, Mathematics or Physics, Chemistry or Biology, History & Government or Geography, Religious or social studies OR with P1 certificate with a Mean grade of C plain in KCSE or Diploma in ECDE from a recognized examining body or KACE with atleast 2 principal passes & one subsidiary pass.
Duration and mode: 4 yrs 110,000/= Per Yr, School based
Diploma in Education (Primary Option) (Options: Science & Agric, Languages, Mathematics, Social Studies)
Requirements: KCSE with a minimum grade of D+ and a P1 certificate with 2 years teaching experience OR KCSE mean grade of C plain and P1 certificate
Duration and mode: 2 yrs . Ksh.65,000/= per year School Based
Diploma in Education (Early Childhood Development)
Requirements: KCSE with a minimum grade of C (Plain), P1 Certificate OR Certificate in ECD from recognized institution
Duration and mode: 2 yrs . Ksh.65,000/= per year School Based
Diploma in Education – Arts (Secondary Option)
Requirements: KCSE with a minimum grade of C + plus with C plain and above in English /Kiswahili with at least C (plain) in the teaching subjects
Duration and mode: 3 yrs 80,000/= per year
FACULTY OF ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY
B. Tech. Electrical and Telecommunications Engineering
B. Tech. Mechanical and Production Engineering
Requirements KCSE mean grade C+ (plus) with B in Mathematics, C+ in Physics, Chemistry & Geography/Biology OR C+ in Mathematics, Geography, Biological Sciences & B in Physical Sciences Or (KACE) or the A-level at least two principal passes in Mathematics and Physics or Relevant KNEC Diploma with a pass and above.
Duration and mode: 5 yrs 140,000/= Per Year
FACULTY OF ARTS AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
Ph.D Development Studies, Ph.D in Gender and Development, Ph.D in Political Science,
Ph.D in Leadership and Governance, Ph.D in Disaster Management,
Ph.D in – Peace & Conflict Management, Ph.D in -Philosophy, Ph.D in -Religion Studies,
Ph.D in -Literature, Ph.D in -Linguistics, Ph.D in -Kiswahili, Ph.D in History
Requirements: Holders of Masters degree in relevant field or its equivalent from a recognized Institution/University
Duration and mode: 3 yrs 150,000/= per year Part Time
MA-History, MA-Geography, MA-Religion Studies, MA-Literature, MA-Linguistics, MA-Kiswahili,
MA-Philosophy, MA-Peace and Conflict Management, MA- Sociology, MA – Public Administration & Public Policy, MA- Development Studies, MA –Project Planning & Management, MA – Political Science
Requirements: B.ED degree with at least upper second-class honours in relevant field OR B.Sc/B.A degree plus post graduate diploma in education or its equivalent.
Duration and mode: 2 yrs 117,000/= per year School based/ Regular
BA-Economic and Sociology
Requirements: KCSE with a minimum grade of C + plus with C+ plus in English with at least C (plain) in Mathematics.
Bsc. Community Development, BA-Linguistics, BA-Kiswahili, BA-General History, BA-General Religion,

BA-Sociology, BA-Social Anthropology, BA-Community and Social Development, BA-Political Science,
BA-Social Work, BA-Developmental Studies, BA-Criminology and Security Studies, BA-Peace and Conflict Management,
BA-Psychology, BA-Psychological Counseling, BA-Industrial psychology, BA- Secretarial Studies & Office Management
Requirements : KCSE with a minimum grade of C+ (plus) with C+ (plus) in subject area or Diploma in related field.
Duration and mode: Full-time/ Part time/ Evening: 4 years 100,000/= per year
Diploma in Public Administration
Diploma in Community and Social Development
Diploma in Social Work, Diploma in Public Relations
Diploma in Music
Diploma in Criminology and Security Studies
Requirements: KCSE mean grade C (plain) with C (plain) in English
Duration and mode: Full-time and evening 2 years 80,000/= per year
Diploma in county governance
Requirements: KCSE mean grade C (plain) with C (plain) in English & C- in Mathematics
Duration and mode: Full-time and evening 2 years 80,000/= per year
Certificate in Electoral Law, Administration & Management
Certificate in County Management & Governance
Certificate in Criminology & Administration of Justice.
Certificate in Public Relations
Certificate in Music
Certificate in Social Work
Certificate in Community & Social Development
Requirements: Mean Grade of D+ (plus) or C- or its equivalent
Duration and mode: Full-Time, evening & Weekends 4 months 20,500/=
SCHOOL OF LAW
Bachelor of Laws (L.L.B)
Requirements: KCSE mean grade C+ (plus) with B (plain) in English or 2 principals in KACE or Bachelor degree holder from recognized Institution.
Duration and mode: Full-time 4 years 100,000/= per year
Diploma in Laws
Requirements: KCSE mean grade C (plain) with C+ (plus) in English, work experience of 3 Years in the relevant field of law after form 4/O Level.
Duration and mode: Full-time and evening 2 years 80,000/= per year
SCHOOL OF HEALTH SCIENCES
BSC in Clinical Medicine and Surgery(Upgrading)
Requirements: K.C.S.E Mean Grade C (plain) & must be practicing Clinical Officer registered with Clinical Officers Council of Kenya or other institution recognized by the COC: Intake Sept yearly.
BSC in Nursing (Upgrading)
Requirements: K.C.S.E Mean Grade C (plain) & must be practicing nurses registered with Nursing Council of Kenya or other institution recognized by the Nursing council. Should be holders of the following; Diploma in Nursing: KRN/KRM or KRCHN or Equivalent qualification assessed by School and approved by Senate. Intake May & September yearly.
Duration and mode: Minimum of 3 yrs. Tuition Fee: 200,000/= per year
Bachelor of Science in Food Nutrition and Dietetics
Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Science and Technology
Bachelor of Science in Public Health
Bachelor of Science in Community Health & Development
Requirements: Mean Grade C+ (plus) with C+ in the following Subjects: Biology or Biological Sciences, Chemistry or Physical Sciences and a C+ in Mathematics or Physics OR Diploma in related area from a recognized institution with at least credit pass
Duration and mode: Full-Time 4 Years 65,000/=per Semester
Diploma in Clinical Medicine & Surgery
Requirements : K.C.S.E Mean Grade of C (plain) with C(plain) in English or Kiswahili, Mathematics or Physics, Chemistry or physical sciences, and Biology or Biological Sciences
Duration & mode: Full-time 3 years,9 terms, 31,700/=per Term, Intake Sept yearly.
Diploma in Medical Laboratory Sciences
Requirements: K.S.C.E Mean Grade of C (plain) with minimum of C (plain) in Chemistry OR Biology/Biological Sciences, English/Kiswahili, C- in Mathematics / physics.
Duration and mode: 0Full-time 3 years 31,700/= Per Term
Diploma in Pharmaceutical Technology
Requirements: K.S.C.E Mean Grade of C (plain) with C(plain) in English, Chemistry or Physical Sciences, Biology and Mathematics/Physics. A grade of C plain in Kiswahili will be an added advantage.
Duration and mode: Full-time 3 years 31,700/= per Semester
Diploma in Community Health and HIV/AIDS Management
Requirements: KCSE mean grade of C (plain) or equivalent examination with a C (plain) in Mathematics, Physics or Physics Sciences, Chemistry or Biology and English/Kiswahili. A pass in Certificate in Community Health or Certificate in HIV care and Management. Be holder of any other qualification accepted by the University.
Duration and mode: Full time/ part time 6 Trimesters Ksh. 40, 000 per semester

Diploma in Community Nutrition and Dietetics
Requirements: KCSE mean grade of C (plain) with mandatory subjects; C in English or Kiswahili, C in Biology or Biological Sciences. Additional Subjects C- (minus) in any of the following: Physical Sciences, Physics, Chemistry Mathematics, Home Science, Agriculture. Candidates with a grade of C- and a certificate in related area from a recognized institutions with two years experience.
Duration and mode: Full time/ part time 6 Trimesters of 15 weeks. Ksh. 40,000 per semester
Diploma in Health Records and Information Management
Requirements :KCSE mean grade of C (plain) with mandatory subjects; C in English or Kiswahili, C in Biology or Biological Sciences. Additional Subjects C- (minus) in any of the following: Physical Sciences, Physics, Chemistry Mathematics, Home Sciences, Agriculture. Candidates with a grade of C- and a certificate in nutrition from a recognized institutions with two years experience.
Duration and mode: Full time/ part time 6 Trimesters of 15 weeks. Ksh. 40,000 per semester
Certificate in Medical Laboratory Sciences (C.MLS)
Requirements :KCSE mean grade of C-(Minus) with C- (minus) in the following subjects Chemistry/Biology/Biological Sciences, English/Kiswahili. They should also have a minimum grade of D+ in Mathematics / Physics.
Duration and mode: Full Time 6 terms of 15 weeks each Ksh. 20,000
Certificate in Community Health and Development
Certificate in Environmental Health Sciences
Certificate in Health Records and Information Management
Requirements :KCSE mean grade of C- (minus) with C- (minus) in Mathematics/Physics, Chemistry/Biology & English/Kiswahili.
Duration and mode: Full Time 3 Tri-semesters Ksh. 20,000
Certificate in HIV/AIDS Management
Certificate in Tropical Infectious Diseases
Requirements: KCSE D+ (plus) or its equivalent. Candidates with special entry into the programme shall meet set criteria by Senate.
Duration and mode: Full Time 1 semester of 15 weeks Ksh. 20,000
Certificate in Nutrition and Dietetics
Requirements :KCSE mean grade of C- (minus) with C- (minus) in English or Kiswahili, C- (plus) in Biology/Biological Sciences English/Kiswahili. Additional Subjects:- D+ in Physical Sciences/ Physics/Chemistry/ Mathematics /Home Science/ Agriculture
Duration and mode: Full Time 3 Tri-semesters Ksh. 20,000
Certificate in Patient Intensive Care
Requirements :KCSE Mean grade of C- (plus) and must be practicing medical worker with a valid practicing license.
Duration and mode Sandwich Four Months (1 semester) Ksh. 20,000
Certificate in Alternative Medicine
Requirements :KCSE Mean grade of D+ , applicants should also be a registered herbalist with the ministry of Social services or be a be holder of KCSE with a mean a grade of C-
Duration and mode: Sandwich/full time Four months (1 semester) Ksh. 20,000
The following courses are offered at the Kisii University Faculty of Health Sciences in collaboration with the Kenya Red Cross Society:-
I. Basic First Aid at Kshs.3,000
II. Basic Fire Safety at Kshs.3,000
III. Introduction to Disaster Management at Kshs.3500
IV. Occupational First Aid at Kshs.5500
V. Fire Marshal/Wardens training at Kshs.5700
Note: Registration is ongoing throughout the year, the courses will be offered in modules for 1 week.
Emergency medical Technician – Basic Certificate Program (EMT – BCP)
Requirements: K.C.S.E C- (Minus) or its equivalent and C- in English and Biology. Occupation First Aid is required. Health Practitioners who want to upgrade their skills will also be considered.
Duration and mode: 3 Months at Ksh. 105,000 (Instruction, Practials and Books)
FACULTY OF INFORMATION SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Ph.D in Media, Communication & Information Studies
Ph.D in Information Science
Ph.D in Information Systems
Requirements: Must be a holder of Masters Degree from Kisii University or any other University recognized by Kisii University senate in related disciplines
Duration and mode: 3 yrs 150,000/= per year Part Time
Master of Information Science
Master of Information Systems
Requirements: Bachelors degree with 2nd class honours (upper Division) and above OR 2nd class honours (lower Division) with 2 yrs experience.
Duration and mode: Evening 2 years 170,000 (per year)
Master of Knowledge Management
Requirements: Second Class Honours (Upper Division) and above OR Second Class Honours ( Lower Division) with at least two years experience
Duration and mode: Evening 2 years 170,000 (per year)
Master of Journalism and Mass Communication
Requirements Second Class (upper Division) Bachelors Degree in Journalism, Communication related disciplines from a recognized university OR second class (Lower division)Bachelors Degree in Journalism and related disciplines with at least 2 years relevant working experience. OR Bachelor Degree in any discipline with post graduate qualification in Journalism, Mass Media, Communication and related disciplines
Duration and mode Evening 2 years 170,000 (per year)
Bachelor of Arts (Communication & Media)
Requirements Mean Grade C+ Others: C+ in English/ Kiswahili
Duration and mode Full Time 4 years 50,000(per semester)
Bachelor of Software Engineering (SOEN)
Bachelor of Science (Computer Science)
Bachelor of Science (Applied Computer Science)
Requirements: Mean Grade C+ Others: C+ (plus) in Mathematics and Physics OR Diploma in Computer Science
Duration and mode: Full Time 4 years 65,000/=(per semester)
Bachelor of Library & Information Science (BLINS)
Requirements: Mean Grade C+ Others: C+ (plus) in English or Kiswahili or Diploma in relevant area
Duration and mode: Full Time 4 years 50,000/=(per semester)
Bachelor of Business Information Management (BBIM)
Requirements: K.C.S.E Mean Grade of C+(plus) with a C(Plain) in Mathematics & English/Kiswahili OR Diploma with a Credit Pass
Duration and mode:Full-Time / Evening 4 years 50,000/= Per Sem
Diploma in Library and Information Science
Requirements: Mean Grade C (plain) in KCSE with a C in English/Kiswahili Or Div. III in KCE
Duration and mode Full-Time & Evening 3 years 40,000/= (per sem)
Diploma in Business Information Technology (DBIT)
Requirements KCSE Aggregate C with a minimum of C- in both Mathematics and English.
Duration and mode Full-Time / Evening 2 years 40,000/= (per yr)
Diploma in Computer Science
Requirements: KCSE Aggregate C with a minimum of C in both Mathematics and Physics.
Duration and mode: Full-Time / Evening 3 years 40,000/= (per sem)
Diploma In Information Technology (DIT)
Requirements KCSE mean grade C and atleast C plain in mathematics and English or C plain in physical
sciences and Kiswahili or its Equivalence Certificate in Information Technology, Programming etc,
recognized by the University senate.
Certificate in Modern Library records management & Information studies (MRIS)
Requirements KCSE Mean Grade C-, Others: D+ in English & Kiswahili
Duration and mode Full-Time & Evening 4 Months 45,000/=
FACULTY OF AGRICULTURE & NATURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT
PhD Environmental Science, PhD Natural Resources, PhD Agricultural Education, PhD Agricultural Extension,
PhD Environmental Science, PhD Natural Resources, PhD Agricultural Education, PhD Agricultural Extension,
PhD Agricultural Economics, PhD Agribusiness Management, PhD Animal Science, PhD Sustainable Agriculture
Requirements: Holders of Masters degree in relevant field or its equivalent from a recognized Institution/University
Duration and mode: 3 yrs 150,000/= per year Part Time
Msc. Environmental Science, Msc. Natural Resources, Msc. Agricultural Education, Msc. Agricultural Extension,
Msc. Agricultural Economics, Msc. Agribusiness Management, Msc.Livestock Production Systems (MSc. LIPS),
Msc. Animal Health Management, MSC. Agronomy
Requirements: Bachelors degree with at least Upper Second Class Honours or equivalent from a recognized University or Bachelors degree with Lower Second Class Honours plus at least three years relevant experience or Bachelors degree with pass plus at least five years relevant working. B.Sc degree in Agricultural economics with upper second class honours OR it,s equivalent
Duration and mode: Full-time/ Part Time & Schoolbased 2 Years
Bachelor of Agribusiness Management
Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Economics
Requirements Mean Grade of C+ in KCSE with C+ in English, Mathematics, Biology, and Chemistry, Physical Sciences OR Diploma holders with a minimum of a credit pass.
Duration and mode :Full-time 4yrs 55,000/= per semester
Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Education & Extension
Requirements: Mean grade C+, with C+ in Agriculture / Biology, chemistry, Mathematics / physics / Geography, C in Biological sciences, Physical Sciences or Diploma holders with Credit pass in AGED
Duration and mode School based & Fulltime 4yrs 110, per Year
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture
Requirements Mean Grade C+, With C+ in Mathematics,
English, Biology/ Biological Sciences, C+ in Chemistry/Physical Sciences or Diploma in related field
Duration and mode Full-time 4yrs 55,000/= per semester
Bachelor of Science in Environmental Sciences
Requirements: Mean Grade of C+ with C+ in Biology/Biological Sciences, Geography, Chemistry or Physical Sciences, and Mathematics or Diploma in related field
Duration and mode Full-time 4yrs 55,000/= per semester
Bachelor of Science in Natural Resource Management
Bachelor of Science in Applied Aquatic Sciences
Requirements : Mean Grade of C+ with C+ in Biology/ Biological Sciences, Geography, Chemistry /Physical Sciences and Mathematics OR Diploma holders with at least a credit pass in related field.
Bachelor of Science in Animal Production
Requirements: Mean Grade of C+ with C+ in Mathematics, Physics (where physical science was not offered), Geography and English or equivalent examinations. An added advantage of grade C and above in Agric. OR Economics will also be considered OR Diploma holders with distinction and credit or their equivalent in Animal Husbandry, Animal Health, Agriculture, Range Wildlife Management and related disciplines from recognized Institutions.
Bachelor of Science in Animal Science & Technology
Requirements: Mean Grade of C+ in K.C.S.E with C+ in English, Kiswahili, Mathematics, Biology /Biological Sciences, and Chemistry (physical Sciences) or Diploma in Animal Health or related Agricultural discipline with Credit pass.
Duration and mode Full-time 4yrs 55,000/= per semester
Diploma in Animal Science and Technology
Diploma in Animal Health and Production
Requirements :KCSE Grade C with at least C in English/Kiswahili, Mathematics, Biology or Biological Sciences, Physics, Chemistry or Physical Sciences, OR Holders of a certificate in Animal Health from a recognized Institution with a credit or its equivalent.
Diploma in Agriculture Education and Extension
Requirements KCSE Grade C with at least C in English/Kiswahili, Mathematics, Biology or Biological Sciences, Physics, Chemistry or Physical Sciences OR holders of a certificate relevant area. For education admission mean grade of C+ and C+ in the teaching subjects
Duration and mode Full-time 3yrs 40,000/= per semester
Certificate In Project Monitoring And Evaluation
Certificate In Enviromental Impact Assessment
Certificate In Fisheries and Aqua Culture
Certificate In Waste Management
Requirements KCSE Mean grade D (plain)
Duration and mode Kshs. 25,000 1 year
Certificate in fish hatchery management and maintenance
Certificate in pond construction and management
Certificate in fisheries and aquaculture
Requirements Mean grade D+ in KCSE
Duration and mode Kshs. 25,000 1 year
Certificate in Animal Health and Production
Requirements KCSE Mean grade C-
Duration 2 years and mode full time
Semester fee Ksh. 40,000
Certificate in Sustainable Agriculture
Requirements KCSE Mean grade C-
Duration 2 years and mode fulltime
Certificate in Artificial Insemination
Requirements: Certificate in animal health, agriculture or any Biological degree
Duration: 4 weeks and mode full time Ksh. 40,000/=
FACULTY OF COMMERCE
Doctor of Philosophy in Business Management (PHD)
Requirements: Must be a holder of Masters Degree from recognized by Institutition in areas of Business and Economics or related disciplines.
PhD Business Administration
Duration and mode: 3 yrs 150,000/= per year Part Time
Master of Human Resource Management (MHRM)
Master of Business Administration (MBA)
Master of Entrepreneurship (MENTR)
Master of Tourism Management (MTOUR)
Master of Purchasing & Supplies Management (MPSM)
Requirements: Second Class Honours (Upper Division ) and above OR Second Class Honours ( Lower Division)
with at least two years experience
Duration and mode: Evening 2 years 58,850 /= Per Semester
Bachelor of Commerce (BCOM)
Bachelor of Business & Management (BBAM)
Bachelor of Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management (BENS)
Bachelor of Co-operative Management (COOP)
Bachelor of Catering and Hotel Management (BCHM)
Bachelor of Purchasing and Supplies Management (DPSM)
Requirements: Mean Grade of C+ (plus) in KCSE with a C (Plain) in Mathematics & English or Kiswahili OR Diploma in Related Field OR CPAK holders to begin from 2nd yr.
Duration and mode: Full-Time / Evening 4 years 50,000/= Per Sem
Bachelor of Eco-tourism & Hospitality Management
Requirements: KCSE Mean Grade of C+ with a C (plain) Mathematics, English/Kiswahili or Diploma in related field from a recognized institution.
Duration and mode: Full-time 4yrs 50,000/= per semester
Bachelor of Science In Economics & Statistics
Requirements: Mean Grade of C+ (plus) in KCSE with C (Plain) in Mathematics or C+ in Economics/ Commerce/Accounting/ Business Studies or 2 principal passes in Economics or Statistics.
Duration and mode: Full-Time / Evening 4 years 60,000/= Per Sem
Bachelor of Actuarial Science (BACS)
Requirements: Mean Grade of C+ (plus) in KCSE with a B- in Mathematics & English or Kiswahili OR
Diploma from a related field of study from a recognized institution
Duration and mode: Full-Time 4 years 100,000/= per year
Diploma in Business Administration (DBA)
Diploma in Sales and Marketing (DSM)
Diploma in Human Resource Management (DHRM)
Diploma in Stores and Supplies Management (DSSM)
Diploma in Project Management (DPM)
Diploma in Marketing Management (DMM)
Diploma in Co-operative Management (DCOP)
Diploma in Eco-tourism & Hospitality Management (DEHM)
Diploma in Catering and Hotel Management (DCHM)
Requirements Mean Grade C (Plain) with C- in Mathematics OR a certificate in a related area with a credit pass
Duration and mode Full-Time & Evening 2 years 35,000/= per semester
Certificate in Sales and Marketing
Certificate in Human Resource Management
Certificate in stores and supplies
Requirements Mean Grade of D+ (plus) or C- or its equivalent
Certificate in IT
Requirements: KCSE Mean Grade C-, Others: D in Mathematics And any other language
Duration and mode: Full-Time 4 Months 20,500/=
Certificate in Micro-Computers & Applications.
Requirements : Open for everybody
Duration and mode: Full-Time 8 weeks 8,500/=
Duration and mode Full-Time 4 months 20,500/=
ATC I & II Cost 6 months per level 10,700/= each level
C.P.A I Cost 6 months per section 13,100/= per section
C.P.A II Cost 6 months per section 16,900/= per section
C.P.A III Cost 6 months per section 16,700/= per section
Requirements KASNEB Requirements
FACULTY OF PURE & APPLIED SCIENCES
Ph.D in pure mathematic, PhD in applied mathematics, Ph.D in industrial mathematics,
PhD in statistics, Ph.D in Applied parasitology, PhD in organic/ synthetic chemistry,
Ph.D in Plant Pathology, PhD in Environmental Physics, PhD in analytical chemistry,
PhD in inorganic chemistry, PhD in physical/ theoretical chemistry, PhD in fisheries & aquaculture.
Requirements: Holders of Masters degree in relevant field or its equivalent from a recognized Institution
Duration and mode: 3 yrs 150,000/= per year Part Time
Msc in Physiology
Requirements: Holder of BSc zoology/ BED science with a major in zoology or its equivalent from a recognised
institution with a second class upper or lower with 2 years working experience in relevant field.
Pre Msc. Applied Parasitology
Requirements: Holder of Bsc zoology/ botany/ BED science biological sciences or its equivalent from a recognised
institution with a second class upper or lower with 2 years working experience in relevant field.
Msc. In Plant Pathology
Requirements: Holder of Bsc botany/ pathology/ BED science botany or its equivalent from a recognised
institution with a second class upper or lower with 2 years experience in relevant field.
Msc. In Analytical Chemistry
Msc. In Organic Chemistry
Msc. In Theoretical Chemistry
Msc. In Inorganic Chemistry
Requirements : Holder of Bsc chemistry/ BED science chemistry or its equivalent from a recognised
institution with a second class upper or lower with 2 years working experience in relevant field.
Msc. In limnology
Bachelor’s degree in biological science or its equivalent – 2 years
Pre- Msc. In physiology
Requirements: Passed higher national in medical laboratory technology /applied biology/HND in animal health or lower Bsc. /BED science qualification than then stipulated minimum of upper second class honours
Msc. In applied mathematics
Msc. In statistics
Msc. in Pure Mathematics
Requirements: Holder of BSc./BED science in mathematics or its equivalent from a recognised institution with a second class upper or lower with 2 years working experience in relevant field
Duration and mode: 2 yrs 110,000/= per year Part Time/ Fulltime/ Schoolbased
Bsc. In applied aquatic science
Requirements: Mean grade of C+ in KCSE with C+ in biology or biological sciences, geography, chemistry
or physical sciences and mathematics. Or outstanding diplomas in biological science from recognized institutions.
Candidates with other related field from recognized institutions and who have passed with credit or equivalent
Bachelor of Science
Requirements: Mean grade C+ in KCSE with C+ in chemistry, physics and biology and C in English and Mathematics OR a diploma
with a credit pass from a recognized institution
Bsc. Chemistry
Bsc. Physics
Bsc. Biological Science
Requirements :Mean Grade of C+ in KCSE with C+ in Chemistry, Physics and Biology and C in English and Mathematics
OR A diploma with a Credit Pass from a recognized institution.
Bsc. in Applied Aquatic Science
Requirements : Mean Grade of C+ in KCSE with C+ in Biology or Biological Sciences, Geography, Chemistry or
Physical Sciences and Mathematics. Or Outstanding Diplomas in Biological Science from recognized institutions.
Candidates with other related fields from recognized institutions, and who have credit Pass or equivalent.
Bsc. In mathematics with computing
Requirements : Mean grade C+ in KCSE with C+ in chemistry physics and biology and C in English and Mathematics
OR Diplomas with a credit pass from a recognized institution
Duration and mode: Full Time 4 years Kshs. 110,000 per year.
Enhancement of course content in Biology, Chemistry, Geography & mathematics
Requirements : BED Art/Science, B.Arts/Science.
Duration and mode Regular & School based, 3 months.
Bridging courses in Mathematics, Chemistry, Biology, Physics & Geography
Those who have not attained the minimum requirements
Duration and mode: Regular, 3 months.
Diploma in e- waste management
Requirements : K.C.S.E C (Plain) at KCSE with C- in Mathematics and or Physics OR Chemistry OR Biology. Certificate holder in electrical or electronics or e- waste management from recognized institution by Kisii university senate.
Diploma in Forensic Biology
Requirements : K .C.S.E C (Plain) With C (plain) in Biology / Biological Sciences OR Chemistry /Physics /physical sciences and
C- (Minus) in Mathematics and English / Kiswahili OR Passed a relevant certificate / craft course i.e. holders of certificate in
Science Laboratory Technology, Certificate in medical laboratory sciences, certificate in applied Biology, from a recognized
institution with a two years relevant experience.
Diploma in forensic chemistry.
Requirements: K.C.S.E C (Plain) with C (plain) in Biology / Biological Sciences OR Chemistry /Physics /physical sciences and
C- (Minus) in Mathematics and English or / Kiswahili OR Passed a relevant certificate /craft course i.e. holders of certificate in
Science Laboratory Technology, Certificate in medical laboratory sciences, certificate in applied Biology, from a recognized
institution with a two years relevant experience.
Diploma in Science Laboratory Technology
Requirements: K.C.S.E C(Plain) with C (plain) in Biology /Biological Sciences OR Chemistry /Physics /physical sciences and C- (Minus) in Mathematics & English/ Kiswahili OR Passed a relevant certificate/craft course i.e. holders of certificate in Science Laboratory Technology, Certificate in medical laboratory sciences, Certificate in analytical chemistry, certificate in applied Biology, Certificate in Electrical installation & Electronics, Certificate in water Technology from a recognized institution with a two years relevant experience. A holder of other qualifications recognized by the Senate.
Diploma in fisheries and aquaculture entrepreneurship
Requirements: K.C.S.E C (Plain) with C- (Minus) in mathematics, chemistry, physics, geography or physical science, biological science, or has certificate with credit in a related field from an institution recognised by university senate OR A holder of other qualifications recognized by the Senate.
Duration and mode: Full time/ school based/ part-time 2 yrs Kshs. 80,000 per yr
Bridging Courses in Mathematics, Chemistry, Physics & Biology
Duration and mode: Full – Time 2 Months Kshs. 20,500
Certificate in Fish Hatchery Management and Maintenance
Certificate in Pond Construction and Management
Fisheries and Aquaculture
Certificate in limnology and wetlands
Certificate in water issues
Requirements: Mean grade D+ in KCSE
Duration and mode: Full – Time 2 Months Kshs. 25,000

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Prof. Ali A. Mazrui and I

img959Prof. Ali A. Mazrui and I

By Maurice N. Amutabi

I had a good, cordial, intellectual relationship with Prof. Ali A Mazrui whom I greatly admired. When he died, I was in shock and watched as his peers mourned him. Among the Abaluhya, young people mourn older people after burial, during “amachienga” (last ambers of funeral fire), after the real fire of mourning is gone. This is Abaluhya culture’s way of saving young people from trauma and big shocks. Many people asked me why I had not written about my great friend and mentor. I cited my Luhya culture, because we are very cultural. Prof. Mazrui was like a father to me, only three years older than my biological father. He attended many of my presentations and said I was a provocative presenter. I have over a dozen personal letters written to me by Prof. Ali Mazrui is his own handwriting and which I now cherish more than before.

I regarded Prof. Mazrui as a mentor and did learn a lot from the Great Professor. Ali Mazrui liked me, and I greatly admired him too. I regarded myself like his protégé, always learning from the grand master. He was encouraging and pleasant as a person. He wrote me each time I took on William Ochieng’ or other academic heavyweights in the national media. When Ochieng’ replied to me through the Daily Nation in an article that was headlined “Amutabi talks tough, but show us his books,” Mazrui wrote to me telling me not to worry, he told me to be strong because I had arrived as a great scholar in Kenya and Africa and should now just write without fear. He told me that Ochieng never attacks an idea he does not fear and taking on me meant that he regarded me as a threat and the next big thing, for he was not comfortable to be succeeded. He told that that Ochieng was not happy with the debates in the media which all focussed on my article, especially the emergence of the pro-Amutabi and anti-Amutabi groups which were elevating me to a national figure. Mazrui shared with me the need for mentoring younger scholars and being fair and civil even as one engaged in public discourse and debates. He told me to be prepared to be disappointed sometimes when some scholars hit me below the belt or use vulgar language or get personal. He made me remember how my daughter cried in school after Ochieng’ had attacked me in public.

Mazrui had an easy smile and an active listener, who would not belittle anyone. He made you feel that your ideas were as important. He made you realize that he was listening to you. I met him more than ten times, and made sure that I took a picture with him each time we met. I am compiling my picture-bum with the great scholar. We were friends, but not close friends. I would say that I am closer to Prof. Alamin Mazrui, his nephew than I was to his fallen uncle, Prof. Ali A Mazrui. I liked Ali Mazrui’s intellectual flare but did not agree with him on some of the issues he postulated. He was kind and polite. I liked his capacity to coin new words and phrases and always told him about it whenever I had opportunity to do so.

I first met Ali Mazrui in 1986 in rather unusual circumstances. I was a struggling undergraduate student at the University of Nairobi when his planned public lecture was cancelled at the eleventh hour, during those dark KANU days. Despite the ban, Mazrui came to the University of Nairobi bookshop to ‘buy’ some books, and word immediately went round that the Great Scholar was on campus. There was a stampede from the library anda handful of us caught up with him at the parking lot between Gandhi Wing and the Geography building. I recall Prof. Kibiwott Kurgat, then SONU Vice Chairman appealing to the Vice Chancellor Prof. Philip Mbithi to allow the Great scholar to address us at Taifa Hall, an appeal that was flatly declined. Prof. Mbithi told us that we were asking him to choose between his job and us having to listen to Mazrui. He chose his job.

We persuaded Mazrui to give us an impromptu address in the car park. For almost ten minutes, we listened to one of the greatest intellectuals that Kenya has ever produced. He told us not to worry about dictatorship because it has a lifespan and is not immortal. Speaking in parables and political metaphors, he told how dictators such as Josef Stalin could not live forever. We asked him to return to Kenya and become our Vice Chancellor and he agreed, saying “….there is no problem, I would love to come back home, just ask President Moi to appoint me and I will gladly come.” The problem was passing this information to the appointing authority, but we did fantasize about life with Prof. Mazrui as our Vice Chancellor, perhaps having address from the VC every Friday in Taifa Hall which was a better idea than watching re-runs of films such as the Rise and Fall of Idi Amin or Cry Freedom.

Many years later in 1994, I met Ali Mazrui at the University of Florida, Gainesville, US where he was giving a public lecture on “The Wind of Change Africa” at the invitation of the Center of African Studies. It was a full house. The hall was full to the brim, the type I saw when the late poet Maya Angelou and Cornell West had visited. I felt proud to be a Kenyan. That Fall, another Kenyan, wildlife expert David Western had come to the University of Florida as well and spoke about eco-tourism and wildlife management in Africa but did not even get half of what Mazrui got for an audience. We sang ‘Jambo Bwana’ for Ali Mazrui but substituted Kenya with Africa. The Great Mwalimu just smiled as we milled round him, struggling to have a handshake with him. He was ours, all the way from Kenya, but Nigerians and other Africans insisted that he was also theirs, African. When he took to the podium, Prof. Mazrui was in his elements. He was impressive and spokes so eloquently. He tore into all African dictators but surprised us by saying that some of them were going to survive the tide of the wind of change blowing across the world due to lack of enough force, pull and push factors, to push them aside. He predicted that some would still be elected under democratic dispensation because of ethnicity. He was right and was vindicated on the account of rulers such as Paul Biya, Yowerri Museveni and Daniel Moi serving two ‘democratic’ terms, among others.

Prof. Mazrui was generous. In 1994 at the University of Florida he gave me two copies of his new books for free. I still keep the books with his signature, signed with my parker pen. During his presentation, Mazrui spent time trying to explain why Africa needed democracy more than foreign aid. He said democracy would allow for more equitable distribution of resources, which were enough but were unfortunately concentrated in few hands such as those of Mobutu Sese Seko and Muamar Gaddaffi. Mazrui responded to questions with amazing precision and persuasion. He predicted that Nelson Mandela was going to become the first black President of South Africa due to the number of black voters unless they were killed by some malevolent forces such as nuclear bomb or massive pandemic like the plague.

In 2001, Prof. Mazrui paid for an air ticket for me to fly from Chicago in Illinois to New York, Binghamton to attend a conference which he was organizing. He asked Dr. Patrick Dikirr, then his personal assistant to take care of us. It was four days of great enjoyment, listening to the grand doyen move one idea after another. At the time, I was at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where I was doing tour of duty as a Fullbright Scholar. I took massive notes from this Fountain of Knowledge. I have been looking at the notes I took and wonder if Kenya will ever have such a great mind. He talked about wide range of issues such as why Africa may have the first female president before US. He said intermarriage between races and ethnic groups beautiful, bright and resilient people (perhaps anticipated the rise of Barrack Obama). He talked about why Ethiopia should colonize Eastern Africa, Nigeria should colonize West Africa and independent South Africa should colonize Southern Africa to bring about stability. He explained how US presence in the Western hemisphere had stabilized Latin America.

In 2002, Prof. Ali Mazrui and I met again at a conference organized by the Association of Third World Studies (ATWS) in Savannah, Georgia, where we drove for almost 15 hours from Illinois to Georgia with Prof. Moses Oketch (of University of London). The conference was organized by Prof. Harold Isaacs. We shared the same hotel with Prof. Moses Oketch and Prof. Shadrack Nasong’o (of Rhodes College, Memphis) and discussed Mazrui’s keynote address late into the night. At the conference, Prof. Abdul Bangura loudly confessed to Prof. Ali A Mazrui that “Mwalimu Mazrui, we have admired you, plagiarised you and continue to hold you with great esteem as the greatest scholar from the African soil residing in America today.” There was a long line of scholars from all over the world, seeking to greet Prof. Ali Mazrui. We posed for pictures with the Great Mazrui. Mazrui was a true globe trotter. He had just arrived in Savannah, Georgia from Latin America via Miami International Airport and after Savannah; he was headed to France, Europe where he was going to speak at a UNESCO meeting. We heard that ATWS paid him US$10,000 for the three hours he was in Savannah.

Mazrui loved sharing knowledge. Many scholars in Mazrui’s league such as Cornell West and Wole Soyinka took over US$50,000 per speaking engagement but Mazrui sometimes took US$10,000. I recall when I was working in the African Studies Programme at Central Washington University; we paid Prof. Wangari Maathai US$50,000 to come to our campus at Ellensburg and speak about environment. I received her from the airport at Seattle and while driving to Ellensburg through the Cascade Mountains, I remember her extolling the virtues of Prof. Ali Mazrui, and how his ‘talking fee’ was unbelievably low for the great ideas that he produced. Of course some scholars have been wondering not so loudly if the talking engagements may have slightly contributed to the burning out of the Great Professor Mazrui. Although it remains in the realm of speculation, it is obvious that Mazrui’s intellectual engagements may have had a contribution to his fast mortality.

In 2003, at Erie State University in Ohio, Mazrui asked me and Dr Godwin Murunga (currently of the University of Nairobi) to ride with him in an official limousine from the conference venue, to his hotel room in downtown Erie. He entertained us in his hotel room for over one hour on juicy intellectual stories and paid for our dinner. As we made our presentations, we did not know that the good Professor had recorded all that we had said and spared us the embarrassment and humiliation in public. He told Dr. Godwin Murunga that he needed to map the collapse of the Somali to broader factors and create a comparative matrix of similar states elsewhere in Africa and find out why even creation of smaller states from the Greater Somalia was not accepted by the Somali and the rest of the world. He seemed to move Dr. Murunga away from Islam as a factor in the problems of the Somali state. He went back to the colonial history where Somalia was divided into three colonial spheres for the British, Italians and French and how this legacy remained after independence.

For my presentation, Prof. Mazrui asked me to complicate cattle rustling in Northern Kenya into a more intellectual argument, and look at external and internal factors and examine the role of politicians more critically than Islam. He said that Muslims also lost cattle in northern Kenya and were also killed. He said that before Islam arrived in Northern Kenya, there were cattle raiding activities most of which were cultural and had nothing to do with Islam. He encouraged me to look for pull and push factors such as poverty than radical Islam. He said Muslim countries did not manufacture AK47 or M16 used to kill people in northern Kenya, and it was therefore wrong to blame Muslims for the violence in northern Kenya. This was one among many conferences where Mazrui cleverly deflected any discussion of Islam in negative form.

I looked back at many of Mazrui’s writings and saw the same trajectory. I noticed that Mazrui was an apologist for Islamic and Muslim excesses in Africa and abroad. I looked at his famous Film series, Africa: A Triple Heritage and realized how he worked so hard to privilege Muslims and attributed great African success stories to Islamic presence in Africa. I started having mixed feelings about Ali Mazrui and wondered if he was sincere and honest in his academic pronouncements. I even started to believe some people who had told me over twenty years ago in Florida that Mazrui was a CIA agent. I was surprised when he said that Arabs did not exert more violence on Africans compared to White European slave traders. I found strange that the Great professor was covering the fact that many African men who ended in the Arab and Muslim were castrated or killed; while African women had their fallopian tubes surgically removed so as not to create black people in the Muslim world. This was different from white Europeans who allowed African slaves to procreate and have families in captivity.

So as not to be misunderstood, let me state that slaves were treated badly by both Europeans and Arabs, by Christians and Muslims and no amount of justification will ever erase the grotesque and dark memories that this evil practice exerted on people Africa and their descendants to this day. But there are now 400 million blacks in the New World, from Brazil where there are 100 million, to the US where there are 50 million to Jamaica, Cuba, Honduras, El Salvador, Panana, Peru, Chile, Argentina, there are many black people in these places yet they received the same number of slaves as Arab countries. At least India preserved black slaves and even intermarried with them, but in the Muslim counties balck people were systematically eliminated and in ways that we see African house-helps treated in many Muslim countries. This is a topic that Ali Mazrui avoided in many of his writings and lectures, something he preferred to sweep under the carpet of the past.

When I first shared these historical facts and some facets of cover up in Mazrui’s writings while I was teaching in America, a friend of mine told me that rising against Mazrui’s ideas in America was like committing academic suicide. This was because in the American academy Mazrui’s voice was very strong. I clearly believed my friend because Mazrui was one of the voices that led to the granting of my work permit in the US for a Fulbright scholar like me who should have returned to Kenya after completing my doctoral studies. I shelved these ideas and focussed on writing about innocent issues. I received very kind advice to desist from presenting Islam in any manner different from the way Mazrui presented it, pointing to less than 1 percent as bad Muslims who engage in violence and not all Muslims. A prominent Kenyan scholar discouraged me from publishing my manuscript on How Islam Undeveloped Africa, arguing that it would annoy Prof. Mazrui and end our friendship and also attract the wrong crowds to me.

Prof. Atieno-Odhiambo once told me, “If Mazrui endorses you, the whole world will appreciate and receive you, but if he condemns you, you will be on the side of Wole Soyinka and have few academic friends in academia” Mazrui had just praised my paper for being bold and deeply intellectual which I had presented at Association of African Studies Conference in Houston, Texas in 2001 and in which I was calling for rotational presidency along ethnic groups in African countries in order to avoid marginalization and civil wars, and domination by majority ethnic groups.

Prof. Mazrui was very vocal on reparations for slavery and slave trade from the West but not from the East. He was a member of the eminent Africans appointed by the African Union to pursue reparation or compensation for Africans for the trauma of slave and slave trade. He was an apologist of Islamic excesses and did not appreciate the resilience and forgiving hearts of Africans. Unlike Arabs who experienced oppression from 1948 when the state of Israel was created, Africans have suffered over three thousand centuries of oppression and invasion by other cultures and have never engaged in suicide bombing, Africans have never created a Black Al Qaeda to kill Arabs and Europeans despite many years of oppression and enslavement.

Prof. Ali Mazrui has left a lot of academic legacies in the world. His famous TV series on Africa: A Triple Heritage will be remembered for the many good things it did in preserving Africa’s past. His many books on topical issues will continue to remind us about his great mind. I first learnt the idea of interdisciplinary research and writing from Prof. Ali Mazrui. It was only recently when I was looking at newspaper cutting from the 1980s when I realized that I had more newspaper cutting of Mazrui’s articles more than any other scholar alive or dead, and interestingly followed by those of Prof. William Ochieng’ whom I also admired a lot. Mazrui wrote about anything and was perhaps the great public intellectual that Africa has ever produced. He was certainly a man who was ahead of his peers in many ways. Mazrui loved debates and was at his sharpest wit during questions and answer sessions, when he would widen his eyes and lengthen his neck looking at the audience as if to hold them in his spell, like a hypnotist. He often left audiences asking for more, because of his articulateness and eloquence.

Many scholars in Kenya often looked for a day when Prof. Ali Mazrui would debate William Ochieng. Now that they are both dead, perhaps their academic sons and daughters will debate one day. I look forward to one day debating an academic son of Ochieng, looking at the influence of triple heritage on former Ruothdoms in Usenge or Uyoma and how Ochieng and Mazrui would have responded to such. We shall forever be indebted to Ali Mazrui for illuminating our intellectual minds and pointing to new horizons of knowledge, many of which ideas have inspired hundreds of doctoral and masters dissertations world over. I regard myself as one of the followers of Mazrui who was regarded as historian, political scientist, literary scholar and political analyst, among other references. Asante Mzee, Mwalimu, Professor Ali A Mazrui for giving it all and rest in peace.

Prof. Amutabi is the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic and Student Affairs), Kisii University. Amutabi@yahoo.com

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Prof. Ali Mazrui’s Life in Perspective

http://www.binghamton.edu/igcs/docs/IGCS%20Newsletter%209%202011%20folded.pdf

 

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Tanzania-China Relations go back into the 1950s to the present

Tanzania-China Relations go back into the 1950s to the present

By Prof. Maurice N. Amutabi

The emergence of China as major industrial giant in the present millennium has provoked tremendous interest and triggered off a sense of apprehension among the major global powers, especially the U.S. and Western European states. China’s ascendance in Africa is new, but not in Tanzania, where it has been operating in many sectors since the 1960s as one of the most trusted and reliable development partners. Tanzania has enjoyed special relation with Tanzania, largely as a result of the great bond created during the Cold War when the two countries were regarded by the capitalist West as socialist and communist bastions. Tanzania enjoys a special place in China’s foreign partnership priorities. Many elites in Tanzania and many other African countries are trying to woo China as a partner in order to enhance their economic status regionally and internationally. The emerging consensus in Tanzania seems to suggest that China has boosted the fortunes of many people by extending soft loans and fair lending terms that would not have been possible under IMF and World Bank in the past fifty decades. Many import-export businesses are thriving and Dar-Es-Salaam port has more arrivals and departures from and to China than anywhere else in the world. It is interesting to note that one of the peculiar characteristics of engagement is the primacy of global geopolitics on one hand versus national economic interests, in influencing and shaping the political, socio-cultural and economic interaction between China and Tanzania.

China appears to have good intentions for Tanzania going by the quality of development that is taking place in the country with Chinese assistance. In 2012, China’s trade with Africa reached US$200 billion, an increase from $170 billion in 2011. The United States has seen trade with Africa decline to $100 billion in 2012 from $120 billion in 2011. The hosting of 48 African heads of state in 2006 in Beijing, China demonstrated this mutual understanding. China’s success has also been boosted by her rich historical relations with African countries during the colonial era, as much as by the adverse impact of the Structural Adjustment Programmes (SAPS), imposed on most African countries by the neo liberal leadership of the West in the 1980s.

From the 1980s, Chinese presidents have visited Africa more than Western Presidents and Prime Ministers combined. Former Chinese President Hu Jintao, visited 17 African countries in a period of just 10 months. During his ten year rule as President, Hu Jintao visited over 20 African countries including giant regional players such as South Africa, Tanzania, Kenya and Nigeria to the smaller players such as Mali, Mauritius, Namibia and Cameroon. This is different from the approach of US Presidents who visit only demonstrated democracies. In 2013, Chinese President Xi Jinping made his first overseas trip to Africa, making it clear that the continent was the number one priority for China, and as expected Tanzania was among the countries that he visited, indicating to the world the special place of Tanzania in the mind of China. President Xi Jinping visited many African countries with goodies that no western country or United States has been able to match.

Tanzania-Zambia (Tazara) Railway is perhaps one of the most successful and single-most transformative investment projects by China in Tanzania and Zambia, costing a lot of money. Therefore, the infrastructure development in Tanzania today owes a lot to China new focus on Africa, where China is engaged directly or indirectly with over 35 out of 55 countries on the continent. China has systematically demystified aid and removed all the obstacles the West has previously put up as conditions for aid. The argument is that accessibility for funds is much less complicated and the terms and conditions are much more flexible than many lending facilities across the world. China is embraced in Tanzania; recent trips by Chinese leaders easily confirm this closeness. One of the nations that achieved the highest level of integration and cohesion in Africa is Tanzania. The factors that make Tanzania the best model for cohesion and integration in Africa lies in the fact that the country has never experienced major political instability which scholars attribute to the ethos and values of Ujamaa ideology. What many observers have noted is the shared similarity in terms of reverence for founding father of the Nation Mwalimu Julius Nyerere, in ways similar to Mao Zedong for China.

A visit to Kariako market in Dar-Es-Salaam reveals that Chinese electronic products and automobiles are increasing moving into the Tanzanian market. Foto trucks are increasingly joining the fleet on Tanzanian roads. Untapped Tanzanian market that was increasingly getting disillusioned with expensive European and Japanese goods serves as magnets for Chinese manufactured goods. Tanzania now serves a rich terrain for re-investment of Chinese capital in areas of service provision such as banking as well as infrastructure development. Complementary to the significant Chinese economic and political interests are vigorous cultural expansionism exemplified by the introduction of Mandarin (Chinese language) in a number of colleges and schools in Tanzania. Complementary to the significant Chinese economic and political interests are vigorous economic and cultural exchanges visible at places such as Kariako.

The revolutionary treatise called The Great Leap Forward by Mao Zedong has often been compared to The Arusha Declaration of Tanzania by first President Julius Nyerere and which placed Tanzania on a great socialist development pedestal. Nyerere enjoyed special relation with the founder of Communist Party of China, Mao Zedong. The success of the Communist Party of China encouraged young revolutionaries in Tanzania such as Nyerere. Nyerere embraced socialist ideas in ways that were different from other countries, because he created his own philosophy of development, known as ujamaa. Ujamaa was a hybrid of sorts, borrowing heavily from Nyerere’s upbringing in Butiama among a large Zanaki family, influenced by his Catholic upbringing of hard work and consideration for the needy. Ujamaa was also largely informed by Karl Marx and the twin Marxist ideologies of socialism and communism. Nyerere was also influenced by Mao Zedong’s Great Leap Forward as well as other socialist revolutionaries such as Argentine Che Guevara, among others. Nyerere was also influenced by the writings of William Shakespeare, especially the controversies surrounding industrialization in which the peasants constantly found themselves under the exploitation of the landed gentry. Nyerere embraced these many influences and used them to shape the kind of development we see in Tanzania today.

China’s interests in Tanzania are diverse. It has moved into areas of oil and mineral exploration in Tanzania, as well as agricultural development. At present, China is involved in the construction of over 20 major official road improvements in Tanzania. Those opposed to Chinese expansion in Tanzania have argued that Chinese strategy is motivated by the need to exploit the rich mineral and petroleum resources in Tanzania, due to the high demand for fuel needed to power the rapid industrialization process back in China.

In conclusion, China is aware that she has to devise a new friendly approach towards African leaders in order to access vital raw materials in places like Tanzania, which are also coveted by the Western countries, as opposed to the Western powers that have a patronizing attitude. Nevertheless, China’s success will be determined by her ability to persuade Tanzania that China is not going to be an exploiter but a dependable development partner, operating under mutual respect. There has been a lot of negative media and propaganda on the investments and activities of China in Africa by the Western media, which are easily ignored for obvious reasons. China stood with Tanzania during the Cold War and during the tough times of SAPS and many in Tanzania associate more freely with the Asian giant more than western powers. They see in China a friend who has a similar past, embedded in socialist ideals and policies that promote the interests of the ordinary person.

Prof. Maurice N. Amutabi is the Deputy Vice Chancellor (Academic Affairs), Kisii University. Amutabi@yahoo.com

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Quota System should be used in selection to public Universities in Kenya

Quota System should be used in selection to public Universities in Kenya

By Maurice N. Amutabi, PhD

The selection for University first year admission has first been completed and as usual national schools and high cost private schools have run away with the majority of slots for premium degree programmes such as Law, Medicine, Engineering, Architecture and Dentistry. There is a problem that we are creating in which students from county and sub-county schools do not have opportunity to send their students to premier and popular programmes at our public Universities.
The Ministry of Education Science and Technology may need to create a quota system in which students who attend national schools should not be weighted on the same scale as students from poor sub-county schools. This should be difficult. It needs to change.

The cut off points established by the Kenya Universities & Colleges Central Placement Board was 60 points for boys and 58 points for girls. The assumption is that boys and girls have the same facilities.

There is a feeling that cut off points for students from national schools, county and sub-county schools should be different. Cut off points for students from poor sub-county schools should be lowered so that those getting C+ of 54 points should be put on the same place with those who score A in a national school.

There is need to have separate cluster requirements for students from poor schools in order for them to access prestigious programmes at out universities. If this is not done, there is no way students from these schools will ever succeed to be sponsored by the government.

Government sponsored students pay about KShs.8,000/= per semester, which is heavily subsidized by the government, whereas privately sponsored students pay about KShs.50,000/= per semester on average. It is unfortunate that children from rich families who make the bulk of students from good performing national schools and private schools are the ones whose fees is subsidized and yet the students from poor school and poor backgrounds are the ones who deserve to be subsidized.

Students from poor county and sub-county schools work very hard to get even C+ on the KCSE exams. It is not the same with students from national schools which have the best facilities and adequate teaching staff. We cannot compare this with students from sub-county schools which do not have adequate facilities and teaching staff and operate under very hard and difficult conditions.

Research has revealed that students who enter University with C+ as privately sponsored students do as well and sometimes even better than those who come in with B+ and above, under Government sponsorship. It will therefore only be fair to open, say 40% of slots in premium programmes such as Law and Medicine to students from county and sub-county schools, and allow those getting C+ to come in under government sponsorship from such programmes.

In countries such as South Africa, students who come from rich and well endowed former white only schools are selected on higher points compared to students from formerly historically black schools in rural and poor neighbourhoods. Kenya needs to have a similar arrangement in order to assist students from poor rural schools and informal settlements to get opportunity to benefit from government subsidy.

Prof. Maurice N. Amutabi is the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic and Students Affairs), Kisii University. Amutabi@yahoo.com

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Senior scholars in Kenya need to invest more in Memoirs

Senior scholars in Kenya need to invest more in Memoirs
By Maurice N. Amutabi

Autobiographies are becoming a popular genre in the world, and some publishers such as East African Educational Publishers under Henry Chakava are encouraging this. They need manuscripts by people in public, to tell us how they lived, what they did well and if they have any regrets in doing things the way they did them. When is the right time to write one’s memoirs and reflections about life struggles and challenges? Very few Kenyan scholars have given us autobiographies, despite many promises of delivering them. Autobiographies play an important role, in reminding us through direct voice, how life was in the past, from which we draw lessons.
In the past few months, I have been surprised to read articles by senior scholars such as Prof. Austin Bukenya, Prof. Chris Wanjala and Prof. Henry Indangasi, many of which have been nothing but nostalgia and reminiscences about the glorious past. My argument is these articles belong to memoirs and we should not waste useful newspaper space on the things that will not improve the present status, and seek to change the quality of life of our people. I was a little bit frustrated particularly with Prof. Bukenya’s preoccupation with flying in East Africa in the 1960s. I was shocked because to me that is small talk, to villagers, at funeral fires in the night and not to a public forum like a national newspaper. I thought that this type of stuff belongs to youthful exuberance and should be erased after the maiden flight and be replaced by bigger issues and bigger ideas.

That Prof. Bukenya spent over 1000 explaining how it was like to fly in the 1960s and suggesting that female crew were more beautiful than today, really riled. There is no big deal in spending in the same hotel with airline crews, and even that should really excite a scholar who has been all over the world, fifty years later. I noticed the same excitement about Machakos of the 1960s and 1970s at Machakos Teachers College and Machakos High School. There is nothing wrong with such reminiscences but they belong to memoirs and not in public newspaper papers, where people are interested in issues that are of immediate concern and relevance to us. I am sure Kenya Airways will not even be interested in how East African Airlines functioned and who patronised it, and Machakos is now thinking to big and too post modern and its attendance affluent to be reminded and taken back to the 1970s school festivals and drama. From Uganda, John Ruganda is perhaps one of the writers that influenced me most, besides Semakula Kiwanuka. Ruganda’s books such as The Burdens and, The Floods evolved around ordinary plots, with ordinary people, spaces and sites. We nicknamed one of our teachers Kaija, and the name remained.
The article by Prof. Wanjala was perhaps the most problematic because he went on and on about his many publications, many of which are unknown and which have not enjoyed wide readership. He avoided some of the public confrontations he has had with his contemporaries and which have been embarrassing, instead choosing to focus on only his strong points and good times. Prof. Wanjala is among few scholars who believe that only those who hold PhD degrees should write for University audiences. He was known to loudly dismiss the works of people like Meja Mwangi, Cyprian Ekwenzi, David Mailu, among others because they did not have PhDs. For the record, I liked Going Down River Road, Kill Me Quick and The Cockroach Dance by Meja Mwangi. I also read some of the books by David Mailu, when growing up, alongside James Hadley chases.
In 1989 at Education Theatre II at the University of Nairobi, Prof. Wanjala took on Cyprian Ekwenzi who was giving a talk about popular literature. I was at the time, a master’s degree student and was keen to listen to academic heavyweights such as Cyprian Ekwenzi. We had been informed that Ekwenzi did not have a PhD and was teaching at University and that he was going to be lynched by our professors. After Ekwenzi had completed his presentation, during question time, we saw Chris Lukorito Wanjala rise up, smiling, with his mischievous trade mark smile, and we knew he was spoiling for war. He asked Ekwenzi’s opinion on people who do not hold PhDs writing for university audiences and if it was proper for them to teach at the University. It seemed like Ekwenzi had been expecting this question and was really prepared for it, to our total excitement. Ekwenzi jumped at it and went on to extol the popularity of his books, especially Jagua Nana and People of the City. Many people had read these two books as well as Burning Grass. Ekwenzi had just released two books in 1987 and was coming to launch them to the East African audience, these were Jagua Nana’s Daughter (1987) a sequel to Jagua Nana, and Behind the Convent Wall (1987). Ekwenzi was exciting as a speaker and explained why popular literature cannot be left in the hands of people like Chris Wanjala. He explained how when it came out, Jagua Nana was on the dashboard of every taxi in Lagos and other town in Nigeria, how it was shared by school boys and schools girls in Nigeria, some reading it under their blankets with a torch. Jagua Nana was translated into 12 languages and ranked second to Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart in times of copies sold. That was how popular his books were. Although the audience felt that Prof. Wanjala had lost the battle, he went on to insist that he cannot recommend Jagua Nana to his students because it is uncritical and is based on uncomplicated plot that will not stretch the imagination and mind of a university student.
I have always admired Prof. Henry Indangasi for his simplicity and unassuming attitude. He has always come across as simple and approachable. I had serious misgivings about his recent article in the Daily Nation, which was a reflective peace, reminiscences on his encounter with the Great Chinua Achebe. He wrote about how he was impressed with Chinua Achebe’s simplicity and how he was moved to be the one to introduce the great scholar to the audience of the University of Nairobi, when he visited Kenya. This is clearly material for memoirs and not for a national audience grappling with many issues of development. This is not the time to tell Kenyans about your little impressions about Chinua Achebe, but rather how the country can get out of the present problems of cohesion and integration and dealing with Islamic radicalization and terrorism threats. In this article, Indangasi came out as a hero worshipper and one who loves power, authority and influence. He was boasting about how he sat close to Chinua Achebe and thereby implying that he is also a literary great in his own right. Unfortunately, I have not come across any of the works of Indangasi apart from the article he presented at Jacaranda Hotel in 1989 at a colloquium organised by my teacher Prof. Mwangi wa Githumo at which I made my maiden conference presentation. In the article, Indangasi spends a lot of time on his times as a student at the University of California at Santa Cruz. He laments about many things, including how there was no African literature. I would recommend he commits many of those old ideas to paper, as part of his memoirs.
There are certain reminiscences that are exciting, such as those one comes across in William Ochieng’s narratives, on growing up in Yimbo, or when E.S Atieno-Odhiambo tells us about Liganua, his village and how they made starch from cassava. I have always got some attention when I discuss my growing up in Ebunangwe. I have always received appreciation from my undergraduate students when I explain to them ethno-weather, telling them how to read the skies and behaviour of winds and how I am more accurate in predicting rain than their so-called weather experts on TV and radio. They get excited to hear how we were taught how to trap moles by grandfather, and many youth get amused when I catch the moles, for they learn a new skill. Those are the type of stories I would like to tell when I become grandpa, not about defunct East African Airlines, or how I greeted Chinua Achebe in 1989.

Prof. Amutabi is the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic Affairs), Kisii University. Amutabi@yahoo.com

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